Marjorie Bruce

On this day, 2 March 1316, Marjorie Bruce died. She was my 19th great-grandmother through her grandson John (who became Robert III), my 19th great-grandmother through her grandson Robert, my 20th great-grandmother through her granddaughter Egidia, and my 20th great-grandmother through her granddaughter Elizabeth.

Marjorie was the only child of Robert the Bruce and Isabella of Mar. On 12 December 1296, soon after Marjorie’s birth, Isabella died; she was only 19.

Six years later, Robert the Bruce married Elizabeth de Burgh. On 27 March 1306, Robert the Bruce was crowned King of Scots at Scone, Perthshire. Marjorie was nine years of age.

In June 1306, three months after the coronation, Robert the Bruce was defeated at the Battle of Methven. Consequently, he sent Marjorie, his wife, and his two sisters north, accompanied by Isabella MacDuff, Countess of Buchan, an ardent supported. Unfortunately, the women were betrayed by the Earl of Ross, who handed them over to Edward I “Longshanks” of England (my 22nd great-grandfather through his son Edward II, my three-times 24th great-grandfather through his daughter Joan, and my 22nd great-grandfather through his son Edmund.)

Although a cage had been built for Marjory at the Tower of London, Edward I decided against this. Instead, he sent Marjorie to the convent at Watton. Marjorie’s aunt Christina Bruce was sent to another convent. Marjorie’s stepmother was placed under house arrest at a manor house in Yorkshire. Marjorie’s aunt Mary Bruce and Isabella MacDuff were imprisoned in wooden cages; Mary Bruce was at Roxburgh Castle, and Isabella MacDuff was at Berwick Castle. For the next four years, Marjorie, Elizabeth, Christina, Mary, and Isabella endured solitary confinement. Mary and Isabella were also subjected to public humiliation on a daily basis.

On 7 July 1307, Edward I died. He was succeeded by his son Edward II (my 21st great-grandfather), who continued to hold Marjorie captive at the convent for seven more years. Marjorie was finally freed in 1314.

Not long after, in 1314, Marjorie Bruce was wed to Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland, who had distinguished himself in battle. Her dowry included the Barony of Bathgate.

Two years later, on 2 March 1316, Marjorie was riding in Gallowhill, Paisley, Renfrewshire. She was heavily pregnant. Suddenly, her horse was startled, and Marjorie was thrown to the ground. She was seriously injured in the fall, suffering a dislocated neck and going into premature labor.

Marjorie was transported to nearby Paisley Abbey, where a son was delivered via cesarean section. Like her mother, Marjorie died at the age of 19 from childbirth. Her body was interred at Paisley Abbey.

Marjorie’s son, Robert II, eventually would become king. Robert II was the first monarch of the House of Stewart.


Today, at the junction of Renfrew Road and Dundonald Road in Paisley, a cairn marks the spot near where Marjory fell.


#familyhistory     #genealogy    #scottishhistory

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Categories: Famous Faces and Places, On This Day, Royal Roots, Watts-Stark Line | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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