Patience (Oliver) Croasmun

On this day, 27 June 1828, Patience (Oliver) Croasmun, my spouse’s 5th great-grandmother, died.

Circa 1767, Patience Oliver was born in Rochester, Plymouth County, Massachusetts to Joseph Oliver and Dorothy Pettis. Her parents were married on 14 November 1766.

Her sister Anna Oliver was born on 18 June 1769, in Rochester, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

Not much is known about Patience Oliver’s childhood. More is known about her hometown. Rochester was first settled in 1638 and was named for Rochester, England, the home of some of its first settlers. The Town of Rochester was founded in 1679 and incorporated on June 4, 1686. The first corn mill was established in 1704.  In 1709, a large influx of settlers came to Rochester from the towns of Boston, Salem, and Plymouth, including Patience Oliver’s great-grandparents Peter Oliver and Susannah Soule.

That same year, Rev. Timothy Ruggles was ordained as the first minister of Rochester. In 1733, Rev. Ivory Hovey became the minister. Rev. Thomas West joined Rev. Hovey in 1743. Rev. Ivory Hovey was still preaching during Patience Oliver’s early childhood. In 1772, he was succeeded by Rev. Lemuel LeBaron.

In 1775, Rochester voted to sustain the Continental Congress, whenever they might see fit to withdraw their allegiance from the Crown, and in the succeeding struggle for independence, this town furnished more men in proportion to territory or inhabitants than any other town in the Massachusetts Colony.

In addition, Rochester had a busy coastal trade from its harbors on Buzzards Bay. Early shipbuilding and the whaling trade were also prevalent in Rochester during Patience Oliver’s childhood.

Tragically, on 5 January 1790, when Patience Oliver was 23 years old, her father Joseph Oliver died in Rochester, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He was only 50 years old.

A year later, in 1791, Patience Oliver married Asa Croasmun, son of Theophilus Crossman and Priscilla Wetherel.

Sometime in the next couple of years, Asa and Patience moved northwest about 180 miles to Hanover, Grafton County, New Hampshire, probably in search of more land. Patience’s mother, Dorothy (Pettis) Oliver remained in Rochester.

On 15 October 1794, son Asa Croasmun (my spouse’s 4th great-grandfather) was born in Hanover, Grafton County, New Hampshire.

About a year later, in 1795, Patience’s mother, Dorothy (Pettis) Oliver died in Rochester, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

In 1800, the Croasmun Family were enumerated in Hanover, Grafton County, New Hampshire. Their family consisted of three white males under the age of ten (one of whom was Asa Jr.), one white male age 26 to 45 (Asa Sr.), two white females under the age of ten, and one white female age 26 to 45 (Patience).

However, the Croasmun Family did not remain in New Hampshire for long. In the early 1800s, many New Englanders headed to the Pennsylvania wilderness in a quest for land. The Croasmun Family was part of this exodus.

In 1807, Patience’s husband Asa Croasmun was listed in the Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania tax list, working as a wheelwright.

In 1810, the Croasmun Family resided in Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Their family consisted of three white males under the age of ten, two white males ages ten to 15 (one of whom was Asa Jr.), one white male age 26-44 (Asa Sr.), two white females ages ten to 15, and one white female age 26-44 (Patience).

Patience and Asa Croasmun and their family were still in Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania in 1820. Living in the household were one white male age ten to 15, one white male age 16 to 18, one white male age 19 to 26, one white male age 45 and older (Asa), one white female age 19 to 26, one white female age 45 and older (Patience). Also living in Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania in a separate residence was son Asa (age 19 to 26) and his wife (age 19 to 26).

Eight years later, on 29 May 1828, husband Asa Croasmun died on his farm outside Cherry Tree, Indiana, Pennsylvania. He was 62 years old. He was buried on his farm.

A little under a month later, Patience (Oliver) Croasmun passed away. Whether she and her husband both had been stricken by illness or if Patience died from a “broken heart” is unknown. She was buried on her farm, next to her husband of 36 years.

Categories: Everyday People, Harwick-Bush Line, On This Day | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Post navigation

5 thoughts on “Patience (Oliver) Croasmun

  1. Pingback: Crunching the Numbers, 2020 | Princes, Paupers, Pilgrims & Pioneers

  2. Pingback: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Land | Princes, Paupers, Pilgrims & Pioneers

  3. Nice…Cousins… 🙂
    Here is our connection…
    George SOULE Sr. (1590 – 1677)
    9th great-grandfather
    George SOULE Jr. (1624 – 1704)
    son of George SOULE Sr.
    Mary SOULE (1680 – 1726)
    daughter of George SOULE Jr.
    Joseph DEVOL JR. (1703 – 1782)
    son of Mary SOULE
    Isabel Duell DEVOL (1724 – 1800)
    daughter of Joseph DEVOL JR.
    Peabody COOK (1767 – 1850)
    son of Isabel Duell DEVOL
    Lucy Ann COOK (1797 – 1870)
    daughter of Peabody COOK
    Constant Cook ‘CC’ WILLSE (1824 – 1910)
    son of Lucy Ann COOK
    Constant Day WILLSE (1864 – 1953)
    son of Constant Cook ‘CC’ WILLSE
    Minnie Adelade WILLSE (1883 – 1952)
    daughter of Constant Day WILLSE
    Then Mother, and us… 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Welcome, Omaeagle. Yes, it looks like you are related to my spouse, who is also descended from the Soules. Here is that kindred connection: https://kindredconnection.wordpress.com/2011/03/12/mayflower_ancestors/

    Liked by 1 person

  5. We are descendants of the Mayflower George Soule from Plymouth Colony. Probably related.

    P.S. Thanks for stopping by and liking my blog.

    ~Omaeagle

    Liked by 1 person

Please share your thoughts...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

The Chiddicks Family Tree

Every Family has a story to tell..........Welcome to mine

The Handwritten Past

Tips, Stories, and Advice from Professional Genealogists

writing my past

in which I document my genealogical research adventures and explore the people and events from my family's history…

Deeper Roots Genealogy

~ Discovering Your Family's Past To Shape Your Future ~

The Wanderlust Genealogist

Bringing Your Past into Your Present!

Delving into the past

Here you shall find, my writings, about my family research, and general research into murders, and other people's ancestry, where I dig deep, and find all kinds of information about my family, whether it is good or bad, and my life itself in general, there are some sad, informative, facts here, which I hope, will get you guys blogging, so what are you waiting for? Get reading!

A Pennsylvania Dutch Genealogy

the genealogy & family research site of Kris Hocker

The Family Letter Blog

Connecting Generations

Discovering Yesterday

Preserving the history of ordinary people

Barb's GeNealogy Life

Combining two of my favorite addictive pastimes - family history and writing.

Skeletons In The Closet

Writing and Genealogy by P.D.Blake

Ascending the Stairs

Because each step tells another story of our ancestors

Our Lineage

Researching Family History One Ancestor at a Time - © 2012-2021 - Wendy Malinowski. All Rights Reserved

Past Presence

A site for genealogists and family historians

Julie's Genealogy & History Hub

Blog of Brass Oak Genealogy

The Family Kalamazoo

A genealogical site devoted to the history of the DeKorn and Zuidweg families of Kalamazoo and the Mulder family of Caledonia

From Shepherds and Shoemakers

Sharing musings, insights, resources and strategies as I discover my family history.

Its good to be crazy Sometimes

A view from the inside of going through the minefield of the British benefit system if you are disabled and the ups and downs of coping with mental illness

WORD!

Words of wisdom, inspiration, feeling

Rants, Rambles, Revelations, Remembrances

Because the voice in my head won't stay silent...

Genealogy for Children

How to engage children in genealogy and family history

Brumley Family Branches

A Genealogy Blog

GenTraveling

Collecting stories from family historians who are climbing their family trees and planning trips to where their ancestors actually lived!

Kindred Stories

Everyone has a story

OurGreatAncestors

Where Distant Family Become Close

Jill's Garden

Garden of Life

Chips Off the Old Block

A blog devoted to genealogical wanderings - dedicated to family near and far, through distance and time

Applegate Genealogy

Helping others discover their roots

Gary A Wilson Stories

10 Minute Adventures, Fiction and Coffee Breaks

Shaking The Branches

Sharing Stories From My Family Tree

Decoding the Family Tree

solving family history one branch at a time.

Bespoke Genealogy

UK and Ireland: Genealogy, History and Travel

The Letters

Louise Mabey

From Ballachulish to South Mississippi

Mississippi family history letters

Writer Within

The Efforts of a Writer Trying to Write

Myricopia

Exploring the Past to Improve the Future

Aquila's Place

An Eccentric Mix of Literature and Opinions

The Women Who Made Me

Finding the extraordinary in the ordinary

F Yeah History

History...but better

Amanda Bradburn

Author | Editor | Genealogist | Bookstagrammer

Winter-Maker

Actor, Writer, and Embroidery Artist seeking beauty and humour.

Today in History

"Tell me a fact, and I'll learn. Tell me a truth, and I'll believe. But tell me a story, and it will live in my heart forever." - Steve Sabol, NFL Films

Miner Descent

Tracing each branch back to their arrival in America

Empty Branches on the Family Tree

Genealogy Tips & Family History

%d bloggers like this: