Caimi-Culatina Line

ABCs & Our Family Trees: Letter G

I have always been fascinated by language, specifically where it originates and how it adapts, mutates, and relates to other languages. That is why I found the recent series of blogs by Andrew’s Kindred so intriguing. It combined my love of etymology with my love of genealogy.  I was so inspired, in fact, that I decided to try my hand at chronicling the origins of our families’ surnames.


This is the seventh installment of a series of posts documenting the etymology of many of our families’ surnames (recent and distant, direct and indirect.)

Now that the F names have been discussed, next up is the letter G:

Gallion (my mother’s paternal line)
French—A nickname derived from the Old French word galier, meaning a man with a cheerful disposition.  

Gallelli (my spouse’s father’s paternal line)
Italian—This nickname surname derives either from the fact that the original name holders were men who prided themselves on being snappy dressers and leaders of the flock or were known for their sexual prowess. This surname is derived from the Latin word gallus, meaning a cock bird.

Gambon (my mother’s maternal line)
French—This surname is derived from the Anglo-Norman French word gambon, meaning ham, which comes ultimately from a Norman-Picard form of the Old French word jambe, meaning leg.

36cbd82d25c17d6e53e54613dd900dcbGarner (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is of early medieval English origin and has three possible sources. First, it might be topographical for someone who lived near a barn or granary or an occupational name for someone who was in charge of the storehouse for corn, the granary,. It is derived from the Anglo-Norman French word gerner and Old French word gernier—both from the Late Latin word granarium or granum, meaning grain or corn. Second, it might be from a central Old French form of a Germanic personal name composed of the elements war(in), meaning guard, and heri or hari, meaning army. The third source is a contracted variant from the English occupational name Gardener, which was normally given to a cultivator of edible produce in an orchard or kitchen garden, rather than to a tender of ornamental lawns and flower beds.

Gay (my mother’s paternal line)
English—There are two possible origins for this surname, both French. The first is a nickname bestowed on a lighthearted, joyful, or cheerful person from the Old French word gai and Middle English word gai(e), meaning full of joy. The second possible origin is locational, where the surname derives from any of the places in Normandy called Gaye, such as that in La Manche, where the name of the place is derived from an early owner bearing a Germanic personal name beginning Wai or Gai.

Geary (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is derived from the pre-7th Century Anglo-Saxon and Olde German word geri or gari, meaning spear. This might have described a soldier who carried such a weapon, or it might simply by a personal name at a time when any name which extolled war and weaponry was greatly treasured. Another possibility is that the name derives from the medieval English word geary, meaning fickle or capricious.

ornateg_250George (my spouse’s stepmother’s family)
English—This notable surname is of Ancient Greek origins. Deriving from the word georgios, meaning farmer, the name was used in Europe throughout the early Christian period, being associated with a martyr killed at Nicomedia in the year 303. The popularity of the name increased during the Crusades, when it became the practice for returning crusaders and pilgrims to name their children after from the Old Testament.

Gifford (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname might originate from the Old French word giffard, used as a nickname for someone thought to be chubby-cheeked. This is a derivative of the German word giffel, meaning cheek.

Gibson (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This notable surname is a form of the medieval nickname Gib, a shortened form of the personal name Gilbert, which was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest. The Norman name was originally Gislebert or Gillebert and is composed of the Germanic elements gisil, meaning hostage or noble youth, and berht, meaning bright or famous.

Gillespie (my brother-in-law’s family)
Irish— This surname is of pre-10th Century Gaelic origin. It derives from giolla easpuig, meaning bishop’s servant.

Gillis (my mother’s paternal line)
Scotland—This surname is of pre-Christian, Ancient Greek origin. It is a shortened form of aegidius, meaning a wearer of goatskin—a reference to a holy man or somebody who did good works. St. Giles (originally Aegidius) left Greece to become a hermit in France. It is said that his Greek name was turned into Gidie, then Gide, and finally Gilles. St. Giles is regarded as the patron of beggars and cripples. The name was introduced into England and Scotland by the Normans with the names Gilo and Ghilo appearing in the Domesday Book of 1086.

Gisler (my father’s paternal line)
Swiss—A variant of Geisler surname, this is an occupational name for a goatherd from an agent derivative of the Middle High German word geiz, meaning goat. 

ornate_letter_g_small_square_tile-r955488faddf54d31a58d28737ba0a041_agtk1_8byvr_324Gingerich (my father’s paternal line)
Swiss—The Americanized form of Swiss German surname Güngerich, derived from a Germanic personal name formed with the word gund, meaning battle, and ric, meaning power(ful).  

Gleason (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—This developed from the Irish name O’Glasain, which originated in County Cork. Glasain derives from the Gaelic word glas, meaning green as in inexperienced as opposed to the color.

Goble (my brother-in-law’s family)
English—Of medieval origin, this surname is a dialectal variant of Godbold, itself from a Norman personal name Godebald. It is composed of the Germanic elements god, meaning good, or got, meaning god, along with bald, meaning bold or brave.

g_monogram_silver_besque_ceramic_tile-r75f7ad749bc84aeb97ea3748d761c58d_agtbm_8byvr_324Goess/Goss (my spouse’s mother’s maternal line)
German—This is derived from the personal name Gozzo, a shortened form of the various compound names with the element god, meaning good, or got, meaning god.

Good (my father’s paternal line)
English—This is medieval surname which seems to originate from the pre-7th Century Old English word god, meaning good. This could be a nickname for a good person—someone who was pious and respected, although given the humor of that time, it could possibly be the opposite.

Goodman (my mother’s paternal line)
English—First, this surname might be a status name to describe the head of a household. As such, it derives from the Old English word god, meaning good, and -man, indicating head of. In Scotland, the name described a landowner. Finally, it might be of pre-7th Century Anglo-Saxon origin. If so, it is derived from the personal name Guethmund, which is composed of the elements gueth, meaning battle, and mund, meaning protection.

manuscript-letter-g-illuminated-ancient-ornate-irish-manuscripts__04320-1446307946-500-750Goodspeed (my brother-in-law’s family)
English—This surname derives from the Medieval English phrase God spede, meaning may god prosper [you]—a wish for success said to one setting out on an excursion or enterprise.

Gordon/Gordun (my mother’s paternal line and my brother-in-law’s family)
Scottish—This surname is of locational origin. It is Scottish from Gordon in Berwickshire and is derived from the Old Gaelic word gor, meaning large or spacious, plus the word dun, meaning fort.

Gorham (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This is a very old locational surname might have originated from the lost village of Gorehambury, near the town of St. Albans in Hertfordshire. The derivation is from the pre-7th Century Old English word gor, meaning muddy, and ham, meaning farm or homestead.

ornate-letter-gGraf/Groff (my father’s paternal line)
German—This Middle High German surname comes from the word grave or grabe, a title for aristocratic dignitaries and officials. In later times, it became established as a title of nobility equivalent to count. It also denoted minor local functionaries in different parts of Germany. Third, it might be an occupational name for a servant or retainer of a count,. Finally, it could be a nickname for someone who puts on airs.

Gowdy (my mother’s paternal line)
Scottish—This surname is one of the variant forms of the surname Goldie and reflects the phonetic spelling of the popular pronunciation of that name. Goldie is itself a diminutive form of the surname Gold, which is derived from the Old English pre-7th Century personal name Gold(a) or Golde, from gold, the metal.

Graham (my mother’s paternal line)
Scottish—Although now widely associated with Scotland, this distinguished surname is of Anglo-Saxon origins. It was a locational name originally from the town of Grantham in Lincolnshire and as such recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as both Graham and Grandham. The translation might be the combination of the word ham, meaning homestead, and the Old English pre-7th Century word grand, meaning gravel.

87daa65575e21cf494e0604873abb900Graves (my brother-in-law’s family)
English—This is an occupational name for a steward, from the Middle English word greyve, itself derived from the Old Norse word greifi and the Low German word greve.

Gray/Grey (my mother’s paternal line—four different branches—and my mother’s maternal line)
English—This ancient name has two possible origins, the first of which is an Anglo-Saxon nickname for someone with grey hair or a grey beard, derived from the Old English pre-7th Century word graeg, meaning grey. The second origin is locational from a place called Graye in Calvados, Normandy, derived from the Old Gallo-Roman word gratus, meaning welcome or pleasing.

Grimes (my spouse’s stepfather’s family)
English—This surname has Norse-Viking pre-7th Century origins and is probably from the personal name Grimr, which appears in the Old Danish and Old Swedish name, Grim. It was very popular in those areas of England influenced by Scandinavian settlements. The Norse word was equivalent to the Old English word grima, meaning mask, It was one of the names given to the god Woden. As such, it might mean masked person or shape-changer, and the name was given to boys to encourage the god’s protection.

fancy_letter_g_postcard-r53440ba3f47e4157876960e44059a6fb_vgbaq_8byvr_324-1Günthardt (my father’s paternal line)
Swiss—This surname was found in the canton of Zürich prior to the 1800s. It might be derived from the German word gund, meaning battle, and hardt, a topographic name for someone who lived by woods or pasture, or from the Middle High German words hart or hard, meaning hardy/brave/strong.

Guiscard (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is a variation of the Norman French name Wischard, formed of the Old Norse elements viskr, meaning wise, and hórðr, meaning brave or hardy.

Gullett (my brother-in-law’s family)
English— It is thought that this surname might have also been originally spelled as Gullick. The Gullick surname originated from the pre-7th Century compound personal name Gotlac—derived from the word god, meaning good, and the suffix -lac, meaning mean play or sport (or possibly lake).

Well, that’s it for the G surnames… Next up are the H surnames.


For more information on the origins of many surnames, check out Almwch Data, Behind the Name, Irish Origenes, Surname Database, Surname Meanings and Origins, Surname Web, and Wiktionary.

#etymology     #familytree     #surnames

Categories: Caimi-Culatina Line, Cole-Marriner Line, Extended Families, Harwick-Bush Line, Surnames from A to Z, Taylor-Thomas Line, Watts-Stark Line, Williams-Stott Line | Tags: , , , , | 3 Comments

ABCs & Our Family Trees: The Letter C

c

I have always been fascinated by language, specifically where it originates and how it adapts, mutates, and relates to other languages. That is why I found the recent series of blogs by Andrew’s Kindred so intriguing. It combined my love of etymology with my love of genealogy.  I was so inspired, in fact, that I decided to try my hand at chronicling the origins of our families’ surnames.

This is the third installment of a series of posts documenting the etymology of many of our families’ surnames (recent and distant, direct and indirect.)


Now that the B names have been documented (Finally, hallelujah!), next up is the letter C. Thankfully, there are way fewer C surnames in our families, so here goes:

rose_capital_c_monogramCaimi  (my spouse’s father’s paternal line)
Italian—Although the family with surname came from the Lombardy region of Italy, the origin of this surname does not appear to be Italian. In Portuguese or Spanish, this surname is roughly translated into cai, meaning falls, and mi, meaning me. In Romanian, this surname is exactly translated into cai, meaning horses, and mi, meaning my.

Cain  (my mother’s paternal line)
English/Welsh—This surname might be of Old French origin and is either a nickname for a tall, thin man; a metonymic occupational name for someone who gathered reeds, used as floor covering and for weaving small baskets; or a topographical name for someone who lived in a damp area overgrown with reeds. This surname derives from the Middle English/Old French word cane, meaning cane or reed. Next, it might be a Norman locational name from the town of Caen in Normandy. Finally, it might be of Welsh origin from the Welsh word cain, meaning beautiful.

Cameron  (my mother’s paternal line)
Scottish—This surname has two origins. As a Highland clan name, it represents a nickname from the Gaelic word cam, meaning crooked or bent, and the word sron, meaning nose. In the Lowlands, it is normally a locational name from any of the various places, all of which show early forms, such as Cambrun from the Gaelic words cam and brun, meaning hill.

letter-c-with-little-angelCampbell  (my mother’s paternal line)
Scottish—This ancient surname has its origins in a Gaelic nickname Caimbeul, meaning wry (or crooked) mouth, from the word cam, meaning bent or crooked, and the word beul, meaning mouth. It was originally a nickname can be seen by a charter of 1447, which records Duncan le Cambeli, the first Lord Campbell, the “le” being the Scottish word lie, meaning so-called or known as.

Camper/Kemper  (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
German—This is a German status name denoting a peasant farmer or serf, an agent noun derivative of Kamp. In German and possibly Dutch, this was a habitational name from any of the 12 places named Kempen in the Dutch-German border area. In Dutch, this surname is also a derivative of the surname Kemp, an occupational name for someone who grew, processed, or utilized hemp.

Carminow  (my mother’s maternal line)
Cornish—This surname is taken from Carminow, a manor and barton in the parish of St. Mawgan in Meneage, Cornwall. The name is derived from the words car and minow, meaning either the little rock or the little city (there is some disagreement on the precise meaning). Also, there is a place in Gunwalloe called Carminnow.

letter-c-medieval-manuscriptCarpenter/Zimmerman/Zimmermann  (my father’s paternal line)
German—This is an occupational name for a carpenter, originating from the Middle High German word zimbermann (a compound of the words zimber or zim(m)er, meaning timber or wood, and the word mann, meaning man.

Caton  (my father’s paternal line)
English—This surname of Medieval English origin is locational from places in Derbyshire and Lancashire. The derivation of the former is the Old English personal name Cade, a survival from a Germanic root meaning lump or swelling, which might have been applied to a large person.

Catron  (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
German—In ancient Anglo-Saxon England, the ancestors of the Catron surname lived in or near the settlement of Catterall, which is located between Preston and Garstang in the county of Lancashire. It has also been suggested that the surname Catron might be derived from a pet form of the name Caterin, which is a form of the personal name Catharine, which became popular following its importation in the 12th Century. This surname is also the Americanized form of the surname Kettering. Finally, it might be a French surname, from a pet form of the personal name Catherine.

PSX_PEB2015Chamberlain/Chamberlin  (my mother’s maternal line)
English—This surname is of Old French origin and is an occupational name for a chamberlain, the official in charge of the private chambers of his master. This term was later a title of high rank. The derivation of this name is from the Old French and Anglo-Norman French words c(h)ambrelain, cambrelane, and cambrelen(c), meaning chamberlain. The Italian cognate camerlengo was given to a manager of a pontifical court.

Chandler  (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—This is an occupational name for a maker or seller of candles. It is derived from the Middle English word cha(u)ndeler; from the Old French word chandelier; the late Latin word candelarius; the word candela, a candle; and the word candere, to be bright, along with the suffix -er, one who does or works with (something).

Chapline/Chaplyn  (my father’s paternal line)
English—This surname is of French and English origin, deriving from the old Norman French word caplain and the Old French and Medieval English word chapelain, meaning a charity priest, who was endowed to sing mass daily on behalf of the souls of the dead. Hence, the name is an occupational name for a clergyman or perhaps a servant of one.

16th-Century-letter-cCharnock  (my mother’s paternal line)
Welsh—This is a locational surname name from either Heath Charnock or Charnock Richard in Lancashire and are derived of the Welsh word carn, meaning rock or stone.

Chesney  (my mother‘s paternal line)
English/French—A locational name referring the village of Le Quesnoy in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais-Picardie region of France. The name originates from the Latin word casnetum, which became the French word chesnai, meaning a dweller by the oak grove.

Chevillon  (my father’s paternal line)
French—A locational surname derived from Chevillon, the name or partial name of the following communes in France: Chevillon, Haute-Marne; Chevillon, Yonne; and Chevillon-sur-Huillard, Loiret.

cecfee4f00a07c2fad43e4c2b11f0162Chilton  (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—This is a locational surname from any of the several places thus called in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Durham, Hampshire, Kent, Shropshire, Somerset, Suffolk, and Wiltshire. It derives from the Old English pre-7th Century word cild, meaning child, (frequently used to describe a youth of noble birth), and the word tun, meaning a settlement or enclosure. In Somerset, this surname gets its first element from the Old English word cealc, meaning chalk or limestone. On the Isle of Wight, this surname derives from the personal byname Ceola from the word ceol, meaning ship.

Christian  (my mother‘s paternal line)
English—This surname is of Old French origin, deriving from the personal name Christian, which comes from the Latin word Christianus, meaning follower of Christ. This male given name was introduced into England following the Norman Conquest, especially by Breton settlers. It was also used in the same form as a female name. In some cases, the surname may be metronymic in origin.

Chudleigh  (my mother’s maternal line)
English—The name is Old English pre-7th century and means Cedda’s leah (farm), with Cedda being an early personal name of uncertain origin or meaning. For more than 700 years, this locational surname has been found in county of Devonshire, specifically from the villages of Broadclyst, Ashton, and Chudleigh. The village of Chudleigh was first recorded in 1259 as Cheddeleghe and in 1290 as Chuddlegh.

42930c9f22d753adafe97eb6c296e0f6Church  (my brother-in-law’s maternal line)
English—This surname, with variant forms Churcher and Churchman, derives from the Old English pre-7th Century word cyrice, meaning church. It was ultimately from the Greek word kyricaon, meaning house of the Lord. This surname was originally given either as a topographical name to one resident by a church or as an occupational name to an official in charge of a church. Finally, the name might be locational from Church, a village in Lancashire.

Clémenceau/Clement  (my mother’s maternal line, two different branches)
French and English—The surname Clémenceau originated in Poitou, France and is derived from the popular French given name Clement, which is derived from the Latin word clemens, meaning mild or merciful. An early saint who was a disciple of St. Paul bore this name, and it was selected by a number of early popes; in fact, there were at least 11 Clements elected by the year 1046. Although predominantly a male name, many nameholders do originate from the female Clementia, meaning mercy.

Clugston  (my stepfather’s maternal line)
Scottish—This is a habitational surname from the barony of Clugston in the parish of Kirkinner, Scotland. The name is found several times in the records of Cupar Angus Abbey. It might be from the name of a place from the past in that area.

Headpiece for the letter C 1834 - Landais, NapoléonCoffin  (my mother’s maternal line)
English—This surname, which is of Norman French origin, was introduced to England after the Norman Invasion of 1066. It is a medieval descriptive nickname, developed from the Latin word calrus, meaning bald, then through the later French word chauf, plus the diminutive ending -in, a short form of the word kin. This nickname, therefore, means the son of the bald one.

Cole  (my mother’s maternal line, two different branches)
EnglishThis English, Irish, and occasionally Scottish surname is generally accepted as deriving from the personal name Nicholas, itself of Ancient Greek origin. It might also have derived from the Old English pre-7th century byname Cola, meaning black. This presumably denoted one of dark or swarthy appearance and possibly might have described a Dane or Anglo-Saxon.

Coleman  (my spouse’s stepmother’s family)
English/Irish—This surname has a number of possible origins. The first is of both Irish and English origin from the Old Irish personal name Colman, derived from Columban, a compound of the Gaelic elements colm, meaning dove, and ban, meaning white. This name was adopted by Scandinavians as the Old Norse Kalman and was introduced into Cumberland, Westmoreland, and Yorkshire by Norwegians from Ireland. The second source is of Anglo-Saxon origin and was given as an occupational name for a burner of charcoal or a gatherer of coal, from the Middle English word coleman, derived from the Old English pre-7th Century word col, meaning (char) coal and mann, meaning man. This source of the surname is the same as that of the surname Collier. Another possible source is also of English origin from an occupational name for the servant of a man named Cole, Middle English a personal name derived from the Old English byname Cola from the word col, meaning coal and used to describe someone with a dark or swarthy complexion.

cherubsColles  (my mother‘s paternal line)
English—This surname is a variant of the medieval surname Cole or Coll from Colin, a short form of the personal name Nicholas. The derivation of the name is from the Greek name Nikolaos, composed of the elements nikan, to conquer, and laos, people. Nicholas and its variants and diminutives was a popular name in the Middle Ages, partly due to the fame of St. Nicholas, the patron saint of children and sailors. Coliln as a surname can also derive from the Old Scandinavian personal name Kollr, Koll or Kolli, an example of this source is found in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Col and later (1204) as Colle, Colls, Coules, and Cowles are the patronymic forms of the name, the final “s” being a reduced form of son of.

Comyn  (my mother’s paternal line, three different branches)
Scottish—The Comyn surname is of Norman or Flemish origin. The surname is either a place-name, possibly derived from Bosc-Bénard-Commin, near Rouen in the Duchy of Normandy, or from Comines, near Lille, France. It might also be derived from the Breton/Celtic element cam, meaning bent or crooked.

Connell  (my mother‘s paternal line)
Irish—This surname is widespread in the Auchry area of Aberdeenshire and in the Province of Ulster. It is an Anglicized form of the old Scots Gaelic names Siol Cuin or Con, meaning the seed or race of Con. It could also be a byname from the Gaelic word con, meaning hound.

65373_letter-c_mthContee  (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
French—Contee is a French variant of the Conte or Conté surnames. This surname is from the noble title conte, meaning count (derived from the Latin words comes or  comitis, meaning companion. This was a medieval personal name; as a title, it was no doubt descriptive of someone who worked in the service of a count or for someone who behaved in a pretentious manner.

Corbet (my mother‘s paternal line)
Scottish—This Anglo-Scottish surname is of Norman-French origin. It comes from the French word corbet, meaning little raven. In heraldry, the raven is highly respected and known for its ferocity.

Cornwall  (my brother-in-law’s maternal line)
English—This surname is either a locational name from Cornwall in Oxfordshire from the Old English pre-7th Century word corn, a metathesized form of cron or cran, meaning crane, plus the word well(a), meaning spring or stream. It could also be a regional name from the county of Cornwall, from the Old English pre-7th Century tribal name Cornwealas. This is from Kernow, the native name that the Cornish used to denote themselves of uncertain etymology, perhaps connected with a Celtic element meaning horn, meaning headland, compounded with the Old English pre-7th Century word wealas, meaning strangers or foreigners.

william-morris-letter-c copyCouwenhoven/Van Couwenhoven  (my mother’s maternal line)
Dutch—This surname has been a more difficult one. Although a neighborhood named Couwenhoven exists in Zeist, Netherlands, this is a recent location. Since this is too recent to be the inspiration for a locational surname, I decided to research to see how the components of this surname translate in the Dutch language. Couwen is the Middle Dutch word meaning to chew. It is derived from the Old Dutch word kiuwan, itself derived from the Proto-Germanic word kewwaną, also meaning to chew. Hoven means courts in Dutch. It is the plural form of hof, coming from the Old Dutch word hof and the Proto-Germanic word hufą, meaning house, hall, or estate.

Cox  (my mother’s maternal line, my mother’s paternal line, and my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname has several possible origins. First, it might have been a nickname—rooster, deriving from the Old English pre-7th Century word cocc, applied to a young boy who strutted proudly like a cock. But as cock became a common term for a boy, it may also have been used affectionately as a personal name. The nickname might also have referred to a natural leader, an early riser, or an aggressive individual. It might also have derived from the Old English personal names Cocc or Cocca, found in placenames. The third possibility is that it might be of topographical origin for a dweller by the hill, deriving from the Old English word cocc, meaning haycock, heap, or hillock. In London, it probably originated from the sign of a house or inn.

Craft/Kraft  (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
German—This is a nickname for a strong man, from the Old High German word kraft, meaning strength or power. The Swedish name probably originated as a soldier’s name. In part, the German and Danish names possibly also derive from a late survival of the same word used as a by-name, Old High German Chraft(o) or the Old Norse Kraptr.

bloomCrichton (my mother’s paternal line)
Scotland—This surname is of Scottish and English origin and is locational from a place near Utloxeter in Staffordshire and Crichton near Edinburgh in Scotland. The derivation of Creighton (in Staffordshire) is from the Old Welsh pre-7th Century word, creic, meaning a rock, and tun, meaning a farm or settlement, thus a place built on a ridge. However, the placename in Scotland is derived from the Gaelic word crioch, meaning a border or boundary and the Old English pre-7th Century word tun, meaning a farm on a boundary.

Crossman/Croasmun  (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—This is a topographic name for someone who lived by a stone cross, from Old Norse word kross, meaning cross, and the Middle English word man, meaning man. In German, the surname is spelled as Crossmann or Crössmann. The first might be a habitational name from any of several places called Crossen in Saxony, Brandenburg, and East Prussia or derived from Grossmann. The second is possibly from the Middle Low German word kros or krüs, meaning pitcher, and hence a metonymic occupational name for maker of these. Alternatively, it might be a metonymic occupational name for a butcher, from the Middle High German word kroese, meaning tripe.

Culatina  (my spouse’s father’s paternal line)
Italian—Discovering the origin of this surname has proved very difficult. I can only postulate some possible origins. First, the feminine singular form of the Italian adjective calatino is calatina. Calatina is a person of or from Caltagirone, a town in Sicily. However, as the Culatina (with a “u”, not an “a”) family is based in the Lombardy, a northern region of Italy, and Sicily is a large island at the southern tip of Italy, locationally this might not be feasible. Second, in Italian, cu is the name of the letter Q, and latina is the feminine singular version of latinus, meaning a speaker of Latin. In the Greek Hesiod’s Theogony, Latinus was the son of Odysseus and Circe who ruled the Tyrsenoi, presumably the Etruscans, with his brothers Ardeas and Telegonus. Latinus is also referred to, by much later authors, as the son of Pandora II and brother of Graecus. In the Roman Virgil’s Aeneid, Latinus/Lavinius, was a king of the Latins. He is sometimes described as the son of Faunus and Marica and father of Lavinia with his wife, Amata. He hosted Aeneas’s army of exiled Trojans and offered them the chance to reorganize their life in Latium. Finally, this surname might be a combination of the Romanian word culă, a semi-fortified building found in the Oltenia region of Romania, and Tina, a village in the Livezi commune of Vâlcea County, Romania, also in the Oltenia region.

ornateltrc-lgCuntze/Koontz  (my spouse’s father’s maternal line and my father’s paternal line)
German—This surname (in its many variations) was first found in Bohemia and Silesia, where the name was an integral part of the feudal society.  The name originated as a shortened form of Konrad, meaning bold adviser.

Curtis  (my mother’s paternal line)
English—After the Norman Conquest, many French words appeared in the English vernacular. Such is the case with this surname, which was derived from the Old French words Corteis or Curteis meaning refined or accomplished, and was originally given as a nickname to a man of good education.

That’s it for Cs, folks! Stay tuned for the D surnames in our families…


For more information on the origins of many surnames, check out Almwch Data, Behind the Name, Irish Origenes, Surname Database, Surname Meanings and Origins, Surname Web, and Wiktionary.

#etymology     #familytree     #surnames

Categories: Caimi-Culatina Line, Cole-Marriner Line, Harwick-Bush Line, Spangler-Kenney Line, Surnames from A to Z, Taylor-Thomas Line, Watts-Stark Line | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Famous Faces and Places: Caimi

In genealogical research, some lines prove more difficult to trace. In our ancestral trees, one of these lines has been the Caimi family.

My research has uncovered many historical people and locations that bear the Caimi name. However, I have not yet found the links that might possibly connect us to one or more of these faces or places (if any connections do exist.)

Of course, I will keep trying to scale those genealogical brick walls and find those missing pieces to our families’ history. Until then, I would like to highlight some of these famous Caimi forebearers.


In 1170, Lanfranco Caimi and Galvano Caimi were documented as “noble people” of the Caimi Family and of “the place of Turate.” Galvano Caimi was the first Governor of the city of Alessandria, founded in 1168 by the League of Municipalities Lombardi (Lombard League).

On August 22, 1202, Lanfranco Caimi sold to Ruggero of Bollate a possession in the Trezzano territory (located in modern-day Milan).

In 1335, Bronzino Caimi, chief magistrate of Bergamo, takes into consideration the proposal from Cremona to build a channel from the River Oglio. Considerations on the construction of the canal, imposition of the duty, derivations of irrigation ditches, list of places and people who make use of the waters of the canal, as well as tax issues and appraisals, were reviewed.

Milano045sProtaso Caimi (died circa 1360) was a noble Milanese knight who fought in the Battle of Parabiago (Nerviano, Milan), in February 1339. Protaso Caimi served as mayor of Milan from 1348-1349. His tomb is located in the third chapel of the Basilica di Sant’Eustorgio, Milan. His sarcophagus (pictured left) depicts the Madonna enthroned, surrounded by kneeling saints. It is the work of Bonino da Campione, dated mid-14th century.

Circa 1370, Azzo Caimi began building Santa Maria in Campagna, Turate. This church was completed about 1398.

Sacro_Monte_di_Varallo_-_statua_a_Bernardino_Caimi-2

Bernardino Caimi (1425–9 February 1500) of Milan/Turate was a religious figure, revered by the Catholic Church as Blessed. A Franciscan friar, Bernardino Caimi was the creator/founder of Sacro Monte di Varallo. Built in 1491, this was the first of nine separate religious complexes located in the mountains of Northern Italy. (His statue is pictured to the right.)

On 23 April 1467, Francesco I and Bianca Maria (Visconti) Sforza, the Duke and Duchess of Milan, granted to nobles Protaso Caimi and Franchino Caimi the feudal investiture of Turate. The endowment was granted again to the Caimi in 1486 and in 1514.

On 23 December 1470, Galvagno Caimi, originally from Turate and a resident of Brera, petitions that his brother Corrado Caimi receive the inheritance from their father Protaso Caimi.

In 1591, Giacomo Filippo Caimi notarized the judgment issued in 1547 by Senator Marco Barbavara, regarding the privileges of the Secco Family.

conte-caimiOn 19 January 1623, Philip IV of Spain granted the fief of Turate to Conte Gaspare Caimi at a cost of 4,160 pounds. Then, on August 12, 1623, Gaspare Caimi (pictured left) was awarded the titles of Count of Turate and Cassina Massina.

In 1719, Conte Giovanni Gaspare Caimi served as the chief magistrate of Turate. Then, in 1729, Conte Gaspare Caimi also served as chief magistrate of Turate. Whether this was the same person or father and son is unknown.

According to the 1751 Census, Turate was subject to the Count Ignazio Caimi, until his death in 1785.

1-antonio-caimiGiacomo Antonio Caimi (1811–1878) was an Italian painter and biographer of artists, who was active in Milan. Born in Sondrio, Antonio Caimi (see right) initially trained at the Accademia Carrara of Bergamo under Diotti but then moved to study at the Brera Academy under Sabatelli. He was primarily a portrait painter, although he also painted religious pieces, including Salome, Daughter of Herodias, The Madonna of Tirono Fair, and Baptism of Christ, as well as some religious frescoes. Antonio Caimi also wrote a book on The Arts of Design and the Lombardian Artists from 1777 to 1862 (published in Milan in 1862). Finally, Antonio Caimi served as the secretary of the Brera Academy at Milan from 1860 until his death.

Giuseppe_caimiGiuseppe Caimi (19 December 1890–26 December 1917) was an Italian soccer midfielder (1911-1913), fencer, and an Alpini lieutenant. Giuseppe Caimi (pictured left) spent two seasons with Inter Milan, making 23 league appearances, before he was drafted into the Royal Italian Army at the outbreak of the First World War. He died from wounds sustained in battle and was awarded posthumously the Medaglia d’Oro al Valore Militare.

1-lamberto-caimiLamberto Caimi (born 30 October 1930) is an Italian cinematographer. Born in Milan, Lamberto Caimi (pictured right) began his career in the field of documentary filmmaking industry; in 1955 he joined the film department of the company Edison, where he met Ermanno Olmi, a film director and screenwriter. Lamberto Caimi was the cinematographer of dozens of short documentary films shot in the late fifties and early sixties. In 1961, he was the cinematographer of the first real feature film of Ermanno Olmi, titled Il Posto.

Arnaldo-CaimiArnaldo Caimi (12 November 1932-December 2008), of Somma Lombardo, was a painter, poet, and writer, who studied at the Art School of Somma Lombardo. A longtime owner of an art gallery, Arnaldo Caimi (see left) himself produced works from many genres—realism, impressionism, abstract, and experimental. Upon his death, all of this works, including a collection of 28 drawings of different views of Somma Lombardo, were left to the Parish of St. Agnes.

Guido CaimiGuido Caimi (1941-1982), four-time world speedboat racing champion, was killed when his outboard craft collided with another boat at 125 miles per hour during a world title race. During his career, Guido Caimi (pictured right) won four world titles, nine European titles, and ten Italian titles. He was the son of Franco Caimi, who was the 1966 World Champion in Class LV and who died in 1981 of an illness.

IMG_8939-1024x578La Piscina Caimi, situated in Via Botta in the Porta Romana District of Milan, is a historic art nouveau pool in Milan: a jewel of the 1930s. During the summer, La Piscina Caimi (pictured left)  served as a social spot for the citizens of Milan and could host approximately 1,000 people. The complex featured several swimming pools, a theater, an apartment block with a sunroof terrace, a tennis camp, and garden. The pool was named in honor of Giuseppe Caimi (see above).

villa-caimi-comune-di-milano-2La Villa Caimi was a manor that stood at what is now Via Aldini, Zone 8, Quatro Oggiaro, Milan. La Villa Caimi (see right) was cited in the Historical Lombardo as Villa Finoli, named after most recent owners. Built in the year 700, the villa served as the Caimi Family country house and was connected by an underground passage to the Villa Scheibler and its adjoining park. Outside the entrance of the property was a low wall with two solid columns. A tree-lined street in front of those led to the barns and stables. In front the villa itself was an entrance of three archways. The villa has undergone several changes in ownership over the years, with many of them have contributed to degradation of the property and structure. Today, sadly, the villa is in a state of neglect.

77_co190-00077d01Villa Crivelli/Caimi/Belloni, located near the banks of the Olona River, is part of a continuous system of gardens and parks. This villa was built in 1620 at the behest of the Crivelli family; however, by 1650, the villa (see left) became the property of Caimi, before eventually going to the Belloni.

#caimi     #familyhistory     #surname


More Famous Caimi “Family”

1. Portrait of Girolamo Caimi, Italian nobleman, by unknown artist

2. Israel in Captivity with the Tower of Babel, by Giacomo Antonio Caimi

3. Posthumous Portrait of Fiorbellina Caimi, by unknown artist

4. Portrait of Antonio Caimi, by Giovanni Visamara  (Please note: This gentleman is not the artist discussed above.)

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Categories: Caimi-Culatina Line, Famous Faces and Places | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

ABCs & Our Family Trees: The Letter A

a

I have always been fascinated by language, specifically where it originates and how it adapts, mutates, and relates to other languages. That is why I found the recent series of blogs by Andrew’s Kindred so intriguing. It combined my love of etymology with my love of genealogy.  I was so inspired, in fact, that I decided to try my hand at chronicling the origins of our families’ surnames.

This is the first installment of a series of posts documenting the etymology of many of our families’ surnames (recent and distant, direct and indirect.)


Since A is the first letter of the alphabet, let’s start there:

letter

Abernathy (my mother’s paternal line)
Scottish—This famous clan surname has an uncertain etymology. It would seem that the name is locational from the Monastery of Abernethy in Strathearn; however, it is possible that the origin might be occupational. In ancient times, families would be granted a hereditary status for maintaining and improving church lands and property. This was a form of over-tenancy common in Gaelic regions as the erenagh, a lay lord—in the case of Abernethy, an abbot—whose family held the office from generation to generation. What is known is that the first nameholder Áed, son of Gille Míchéil. Áed was the Abbot of Abernethy, and he was succeeded by his son Orm.

Achenbach (my father’s paternal line)
German—Habitational name from places in Hesse and Westphalia named Achenbach, from the obsolete word ach or ache, meaning running water or stream, and the word bach, meaning brook.

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Addleborough (my mother’s maternal line)
English—A possible locational surname for person originating from either Aldborough or Attleborough. Aldborough is a village in the civil parish of Boroughbridge in the Borough of Harrogate in North Yorkshire, England.  In the Domesday Book, Aldborough was referred to as Burgh (from the Old English word, burh, meaning ancient fortification). By 1145, the prefix ald (meaning old) had been added. Attleborough is a market town and civil parish between Norwich and Thetford in Norfolk, England. The Anglo-Saxon foundation of the settlement is unrecorded. A popular theory of the town’s origin makes it a foundation of an Atlinge, and certainly burgh (or burh) indicates that it was fortified at an early date. According to the mid-12th Century hagiographer of Saint Edmund, Galfridus de Fontibus, Athla was the founder of the ancient and royal town of Attleborough in Norfolk. In the Domesday Book, it is referred to as Attleburc.

Alden (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—Alden is a medieval English surname, deriving from the personal name of the pre-7th Century ealdwine, meaning old friend. The Latinized version, Aldanus, and Alden are recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086. Another early recording although not as a surname is that of Gamel filius Alden in the Pipe Rolls of Westmorland in 1196.

v1p055-historiated-initial-letter-a-q75-500x474

Allemong/Allamon (my spouse’s stepfather’s paternal family)
German—This surname derives from the Alemanni were a confederation of Germanic tribes on the upper Rhine river. First mentioned by Cassius Dio in the context of the campaign of Caracalla of 213, the Alemanni captured the Agri Decumates in 260, and later expanded into present-day Alsace, and northern Switzerland, leading to the establishment of the Old High German language in those regions. In 496, the Alemanni were conquered by Frankish leader Clovis and incorporated into his fold. Mentioned as still pagan allies of the Christian Franks, the Alemanni were gradually Christianized during the 7th Century. The Pactus Alamannorum is a record of their customary law during this period. Until the 8th Century, Frankish suzerainty over Alemannia was mostly nominal. But after an uprising by Theudebald, Duke of Alamannia, Carloman executed the Alamannic nobility and installed Frankish dukes. During the later and weaker years of the Carolingian Empire the Alemannic counts became almost independent, and a struggle for supremacy took place between them and the Bishopric of Constance. The chief family in Alamannia was that of the counts of Raetia Curiensis, who were sometimes called margraves. One such margrave, Burchard II, established the Duchy of Swabia, which was recognized by Henry the Fowler in 919 and became a stem duchy of the Holy Roman Empire. The area settled by the Alemanni corresponds roughly to the area where Alemannic German dialects remain spoken, including German Swabia and Baden, French Alsace, German-speaking Switzerland, and Austrian Vorarlberg.

Allen (my mother’s maternal line)
English—This distinguished surname, with more than 50 heraldic Coats of Arms granted to name holders and having several notable entries in the British Dictionary of National Biography, is equally widespread in England, Scotland and Ireland. It derives from the Gaelic and Breton personal name of the pre-Christian era Ailin, which loosely translates as little rock, although it may also mean harmony. The first recorded name bearer was Alawn, a legendary poet of the 5th Century, reputed to be one of the three foremost musicians of the period. From early times the spelling form has varied considerably not least in the Celtic countries where it has ranged from Eilian to Alwyn and Alleyne. The Bretons, who were originally British settlers in France, returned as invaders with William, Duke of Normandy, otherwise known as The Conqueror, in 1066; in so doing, it is claimed, re-introduced the name into England. Certainly Alanus, without a surname, is recorded in the Domesday Book for the county of Suffolk.

AAmes (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is of medieval English origin, and derives from the Old French given name (or nickname) Amis, meaning friends, ultimately from the Latin amicus, a derivative of amare, a word that means to love. The name was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066, and the forms Amicia (feminine) and Amicus (masculine) are recorded respectively in documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire, dated 1189, and in the Curia Regis Rolls of Hertfordshire, dated 1211. One Rogerus filius (son of) Ami was noted in the Cartulary of Ramsey Abbey, Norfolk, circa 1250, and a Robert Amys appears in the 1273 Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire.

Anderson (my spouse’s father’s maternal line and my brother-in-law’s maternal family)
English and Scottish— Of English and Scottish origin, this surname is a patronymic of the surname Andrew, which is derived from the personal name from the Greek Andreas, a derivative of andreios, mainly from aner, meaning man, male. The personal name was first recorded as Andreas in the Domesday Book, and the surname was first recorded in Scotland with one John Andree, who was present at the perambulation of the boundaries of Kyrknes and Louchor in 1395.

church-letterAppleton (my brother-in-law’s maternal family)
English—Of Anglo-Saxon origin, this surname is locational. Several places are called Appleton, in the counties of Cumberland, Lancashire, Yorkshire, Norfolk, Cheshire, Berkshire and Kent. Recorded as Apeltun and Epletune in the Domesday Book for the various counties, the name derives from the Old English pre-7th Century word aeppeltun, meaing an orchard—a compound of aeppel, an apple, and tun, an enclosure or settlement.

Arbaugh (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
German—A form of Arbach, this surname is a habitational name from any of several places called Arbach, as for example a village in the Rhineland, west of Koblenz, which is named from Middle High German ar(n), meaning eagle, and bach, meaning brook.

795fee76d86e039bc2f8d21e8f021343Archambault (my brother-in-law’s paternal family)
French—This surname was originally derived from the Latin word Arcambaldus. However, according to etymologists, this Old French personal name of Germanic origin, is composed of the Old High German word ercan, meaning precious or excellent, and bald, meaning bold or daring.

Ardinger (my father’s maternal line)
German—A varient of Erdinger, this locational surname for person originating from Erding, one of the oldest parts of Bavaria. Erding was located midway between two centers of power in the Wittelsbach state, Munich and Landshut. Circa 1230, a castle was built on the River Sempt in order to secure the road. This castle grew to become the city of Erding.

009-initial-cap-a-scholars-books-q90-908x924Arenghi (my spouse’s father’s paternal line)
Italian—From the Medieval Latin word, arengum, meaning ring or circle, Arenghi is the plural form of Arengo. The Arengo was the name of the assembly that ruled San Marino, a mountainous microstate surrounded by Italy, from the 5th Century to 1243. San Marino might possibly be the oldest surviving sovereign state and constitutional republic in the world, as the continuation of the monastic community founded on 3 Sep 301, by stonecutter Marinus of Arba. Legend has it that  Marinus left Rab, then the Roman colony of Arba, in 257, when the future emperor Diocletian issued a decree calling for the reconstruction of the city walls of Rimini, which had been destroyed by Liburnian pirates.

Arter (my spouse’s stepmother’s paternal family)
Scottish and English—This surname is the subject of some controversy regarding its origins. Certainly, it derives from the Celtic personal name Arthur, but there is some doubt as to the etymology of the name. It is thought to be composed of Old Welsh word arth, meaning bear, and the Old Welsh word gwr, meaning hero. The Old Norse personal name Arnthorr, derived from arn, eagle, and Þórr (pronounced Thor), the God of Thunder, has been absorbed into the Celtic name Arthur, the legendary King of the Britons, who fought against the Saxon invaders.

InitialAArtley/Ertley (my spouse’s stepmother’s paternal family)
English and German—Although this is a known English surname, the original family surname was spelled Ertley. This family was of Germanic background. As of this time, I have discovered no concrete entomology for this surname. However, I can postulate that this name derives from Ertle/Ertel, a surname originating from South Germany from the Old High German word ort, meaning point (of a sword or lance), tip, or extremity. Specifically, this was a German name for someone who lived at the top of a hill or at the end of a settlement.

Asbury (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This name is of English locational origin from a place in Cheshire called Astbury, recorded as Esteburi circa 1100 in the Pipe Rolls of that county, and as Asteburi circa 1180. The name derives from the Old English pre-7th Century word este, meaning east, and burh, meaning a fortified town.

2.3.1_Acap_large_600x580pxAtwood (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—This is a very old topographical surname of Anglo-Saxon origin for someone who lived by a wood. The name derives from the Old English pre-7th Century word aet, meaning at, with the Old English word wudu, meaning wood.

Audley (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a locational in origin, deriving from the place called Audley in Staffordshire. This place name is recorded in the Domesday Book as Aldidelege and in the Staffordshire Pipe Rolls of 1182 as Aldithelega. The name means Ealdgith’s glade, derived from the Old English pre-7th Century female personal name Ealdgyð, composed of the elements eald, meaning old; gyth, meaning battle; and leah, meaning clearing in the woods, glade.

62370_letter-a_lgAvent (my mother’s maternal line)
French and English—This surname is of Old French origin, introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. It derives from the Old French word auenant, the present participle of the verb avenir, meaning to arrive, happen, or come to.

Aynsdale (my mother’s paternal line)
English—Although a variation of spelling, the origin of this surname is most likely locational, referring to one who originated in Ainsdale, in the county of Lancashire.


Well, that’s it for the A surnames in our families. Next up are the B names

For more information on the origins of many surnames, check out Almwch Data, Behind the Name, Irish Origenes, Surname Database, Surname Meanings and Origins, Surname Web, and Wiktionary.

 

#etymology     #familytree     #surnames

Categories: Caimi-Culatina Line, Cole-Marriner Line, Extended Families, Harwick-Bush Line, Noel-Ardinger Line, Spangler-Kenney Line, Surnames from A to Z, Taylor-Thomas Line, Watts-Stark Line, Williams-Stott Line | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Mariner Men

Two Ships at Anchor

 

My mother’s maternal line is Cole-Marriner. Marriner is an English surname with medieval French origins, deriving from the word mariniera sailor/seaman. However, as seaman and sailor were already popular occupational descriptions prior to the Norman invasion of Britain, it is possible that the French term might have had a more specific meaning. It is speculated that the Marriner surname was given to traveling merchants who purchased goods overseas.

The first known Marriner in our family tree is George Marriner (my 7th great-grandfather, maternal mother’s side).  In 1733, he was licensed to run a ferry between Newington and Dover, New Hampshire. Then, in 1739, George was in Eliot, Maine, where he was licensed to run a ferry between Kittery to Falmouth, Maine.  George Marriner, a ferryman, was a mariner both in name and profession.

This discovery made me wonder whether or not we had more kin who plied their trade on the water. After much research, I have discovered other “mariner men” within the branches of our family trees (both direct and extended).

Donald Robert Oker (husband of my spouse’s 1st cousin once removed, maternal mother’s side) served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War.

Walter Caimi (my spouse’s paternal grandfather) was enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps, serving for several years. In 1933, he spent a month on the USS Argonne, before being stationed on the USS Arkansas. He served aboard the Arkansas for two years, before being stationed at the Naval Ammunition Depot in Portsmouth, Virginia, where he remained exclusively until April 1936. In May 1936, Walter traveled to the the Naval Ordnance Plant in South Charleston, West Virginia. He was only in West Virginia for a month; however, in that brief time, he met his future wife, Reba Spangler. Then, for the next six months, Walter served back and forth between Portsmouth, Virginia and the Navy Yard in Washington D.C. He was back at Portsmouth once again in November 1936. In January 1937, he and Reba were married in Charleston, West Virginia. Walter remained stateside from that point on, retiring from the Marines in December 1940.

In December 1939, Walter’s brother Renzo Caimi (my spouse’s paternal great-uncle) also enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps. Marine detachments served aboard Navy cruisers, battleships, and aircraft carriers. Marine detachments acted as a ship’s landing force, manning the ship’s weapons, and provided shipboard security. They also took were key to amphibious assaults. Renzo opted to join the Amphibious Corps. After basic training, Renzo boarded the USS Chaumont, bound for Hawaii, a U.S. territory. Starting in May 1940, Renzo was stationed in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. He was still stationed there when the Japanese attacked. Renzo continued to serve in the Marines throughout World War II, fighting in the Pacific Campaign.

Cletis Leroy Watts (my maternal grandfather) was a coxswain (cox) in the U.S. Naval Reserves during WWII. A coxswain is the person in charge of a boat, particularly its navigation and steering. In World War II, coxswains piloted landing craft—boats and seagoing vessels used to convey a landing force (infantry and vehicles) from the sea to the shore during amphibious assaults. Cletis, nicknamed Red—a native of Missouri—passed through the Miami area at some point during WWII. It was here that he met his future wife, Florence Jean Cole, at a movie theater. Jean worked as a ticket seller, and Red thought she was so pretty, he went to the movies several times just to see her.  The two were married in Dade County, Florida in 1944.

Frank William Darby (husband of my maternal second great-aunt) was a carpenter’s mate, second class (CM2) in the U.S. Naval Reserves during WWII. He served on the USS Sparrow in the Pacific Campaign. He married Thelma Marriner in 1942.

Stephen Earl Noell (my great-grandfather, paternal mother’s side) was a seaman apprentice in the U.S. Navy during WWI. He was at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station, Chicago. A seaman apprentice is the second lowest enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy. Those in the general deck and administrative community are seamen apprentices. They wear white stripes on navy blue uniforms and navy blue (black) stripes on white uniforms. After the war, Stephen moved to Washington County, Maryland, where he met and married Thelma Ardinger. However, he went back to Chicago briefly, showing up in the 1930 U.S. Census for Cook County, Illinois.

Howard Wilbur Cole (my great-grandfather, maternal mother’s side) served in the U.S. Coast Guard during WWII. He was stationed in Miami. They would patrol the Gulf Stream during the evening hours to make sure the German submarines would not enter American waters.

Capt. George Records (my spouse’s 4th great-grandfather, maternal mother’s side) was the captain of an artillery company under Col. Rees Hill‘s Regiment, Pennsylvania Militia, on the Niagara frontier during the War of 1812. Although he was not in the Navy, Capt. George Records was present at the Battle of Lake Erie, fought on 10 September 1813, defending the naval yard. Nine vessels of the United States Navy defeated and captured six vessels of the British Royal Navy. This ensured American control of the lake for the rest of the war and was one of the biggest naval battles of the War of 1812.

In 1775, Christian Ardinger (my 6th great-grandfather, paternal mother’s side) began operating Ardinger’s Ferry near Williamsport, Maryland. Twenty years later, in 1795, the ferry was sold to Peter Light, and its new moniker was Light’s Ferry. Eventually, the ferry was passed down to Robert Lemen (who married Sarah Light, granddaughter of Peter Light) and was converted into a cable ferry. In 1861, Union forces under Captain Abner Doubleday used this ferry to cross into Virginia for raids. In 1863, Doubleday again crossed the river by fording while pursuing Gen. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia as it advanced on Gettysburg. A month later, following Lee’s defeat, 70,000 confederate soldiers crossed at Lemen’s Ferry. The ferry was then passed down to Robert Leman’s daughter Elizabeth Virginia Lemen and her husband Charles Andrew Ardinger (my 4th great-uncle, son of my 4th great-grandfather, Charles Godfrey Ardinger, paternal mother’s side). This ferry, which had stayed in our extended family for generations, was decommissioned in 1909, when a bridge spanning the Potomac River was erected.

Capt. William Raiford (my 8th great-grandfather, maternal father’s side) was certified as a Master and Ship Captain. His certificate was signed May 1716 by Capt. Jonathan Steele of Port Tobacco, Charles County, Maryland.

Capt. John Paine (my spouse’s 8th great-grandfather, maternal father’s side) was born in 1685 in Massachusetts and died on 17 December 1765, in Freetown, Bristol, Massachusetts.

Capt. Matthew Strickland (my 10th great-grandfather, maternal father’s side) was the son of James Strickland of Crosswaite and Lyth. Like his father before him, Matthew was a Mate, Master, and Ship Captain.

Capt. Christopher Hussey (my spouse’s 10th great-grandfather, paternal mother’s side) and his wife Theodate Bachiler sailed for America in 1632 on the ship William and Francis. Their family was one of the original purchasers of Nantucket. Christopher Hussey was also the captain of a whaling ship. Supposedly, according to family legend, Christopher Hussey was the first Nantucket whaler to harvest a spermaceti whale, although historians speculate that it might have been one of his sons or grandsons.

Capt. Tristram Hull (my 11th great-grandfather, maternal mother’s side) owned a ship named The Catch, was part owner of the bark Hopewell, and made frequent long sea voyages. Customs entries show that he was engaged to a considerable extent in trade with the West Indies.

Capt. Thomas Lorrin (my 11th great-grandfather, maternal father’s side) was the son of Capt. John Lorrin and his wife, Anne Vyearye. Like his father, Thomas was certified as a Mate, Master, and Ship Captain. Thomas Lorrin hired out to Barker and Associates of London; Charles City County, Virginia; Amsterdam and Rotterdam; Bruges and Brussels.

Capt. James Strickland (my 11th great-grandfather, maternal father’s side) was a Mate, Master, and Ship Captain. He worked out of Morecambe & Liverpool, Lancashire.

Capt. John Lorrin (my 12th great-grandfather, maternal father’s side) and his wife, Anne Vyearye, were married on January 8, 1613 in Honiton, Devon, England. John Lorrin was certified as a Mate, Master, and Ship Captain. The Lorrin family originated in France.

Abraham Vardal (Vardel) (my 12th great-grandfather, maternal father’s side) was a sailor/mariner. He and his wife, Sarah Webster, married in 1610 at St. Leonard, Eastcheap Parish in London.

 

#familytree     #genealogy    #mariner

Categories: Caimi-Culatina Line, Cole-Marriner Line, Extended Families, Harwick-Bush Line, Noel-Ardinger Line, Spangler-Kenney Line, Watts-Stark Line, Williams-Stott Line | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

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GraveSeeker's Diary

“I am the now of the then. My body is the embodiment of all my ancestors who came before me. They live on in me.” ― Jarod Kintz.

Descended from Royalty

Life is lived forward, but understood backward

Filling in the Family Tree

Hopper, Hedrick, Cowan, Hinson, Gray, Hickman, Reece, Perkins and more

Rael & Fernandez Family History

Recording and sharing my journey learning about my ancestors

familytreegirldotcom

This WordPress.com site is the bee's knees

The Redeeming Thread

My crazy life adventures that always seem to have one redeeming thread.

Forgotten Ancestors

Tracing The Faces

My Ducks in a Row

using FamilySearch and Ancestry.com to organize your family history

Almost Home

Genealogy Research and Consulting

The Genealogist's Craft

My aim is to tell interesting stories of how genealogical information comes to be. Please pull up an armchair ...

Tracking Down The Family

Family History and Genealogy

The Handwritten Past

Thoughts on Family History and Genealogy

Shaking the Family Tree

Let the nuts fall where they may.

Quiet Echoes In Time

Thinking Today About Countless Yesterdays

PastToPresentGenealogy

Family History Research by Jane Roberts

Expressing my family history

and other random thoughts...

The Family Stump

The branches, leaves and stumps of our family tree

A Wise Heart's Journey

Finding ancestors one step at a time.

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