Harwick-Bush Line

ABCs & Our Family Trees: Letters I & J

  

I have always been fascinated by language, specifically where it originates and how it adapts, mutates, and relates to other languages. That is why I found the recent series of blogs by Andrew’s Kindred so intriguing. It combined my love of etymology with my love of genealogy.  I was so inspired, in fact, that I decided to try my hand at chronicling the origins of our families’ surnames.


This is the ninth installment of a series of posts documenting the etymology of many of our families’ surnames (recent and distant, direct and indirect.)

Now that the H names have been discussed, next up are the letters I and J:

Ihrich (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
German—This surname is composed of the Old High German word ih, meaning I, and the German word ric/reich, meaning rich or powerful.

Isaac (my mother’s paternal line and my brother-in-law’s family)
English—Of Biblical origins, Isaac was the son of Abraham and Sarah. derived from the Hebrew word yiṣḥāq, meaning [he] laughs. The traditional explanation of the name is that Abraham and Sarah laughed with joy at the birth of a son to them in their old age, but a more plausible explanation is that the name originally meant may God laugh/smile on him. In England and Wales, it was one of the Old Testament names that were particularly popular among Nonconformists in the 17th through 19th centuries.

Isted (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname might be a form of Highstead, a locality/village in the county of Kent. However, it might be the name of a lost medieval village. It could be a variation of  East Head, a village far away in the north of Scotland. Highstead means high farm.

Izard (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is of pre-6th Century Germanic origins. It has two possible origins. The first is from the female personal name Isolde, much associated with the ancient tale of Tristran and Isolde. It is composed of is, meaning ice, and hild, meaning battle, or the masculine Ishard, with the elements is, meaning ice, and hard, meaning hardy or strong. The second possible origin is from the Old Provencal word izar, meaning mountain goat—a nickname given to a good climber or a sprightly, lively person.

Jacobs/Jacobusse (my spouse’s mother’s maternal line)
Dutch—These are patronymic medieval surnames, derived from the Latin name Jacobus. Jacobus is derived from the Hebrew language personal name Yaakov, from the Hebrew word akev, meaning heel. In the Bible, this is the name of the younger twin brother of Esau who took advantage of the latter’s hunger and impetuous nature to persuade him to part with his birthright for a mess of pottage. Jacob was said to have been born holding on to Esau’s heel.

James (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
English—This medieval surname is of both Biblical and 12th Century Crusader origins. It has its origins in the Hebrew given name Yaakov. Traditionally, the name is interpreted as coming from the word akev, meaning a heel, but has also been interpreted as he who supplanted. Both of these meanings are influenced by the Biblical story of Esau and his younger twin brother Jacob. Jacob is said to have been born holding on to Esau’s heel and took advantage of Esau’s hunger to persuade him to part with his birthright in exchange for food.

Jansen (my spouse’s mother’s maternal line)
Dutch—This is a Dutch/Flemish and Low German patronymic surname meaning son of Jan, a common derivative of Johannes. It is equivalent to the English surname Johnson.

Jenkinson (my brother-in-law’s family)
English—This English surname is much associated with Wales. It is a patronymic form of the medieval male given name Jenkin (son of Jenkin) from the Hebrew name Yochan, meaning the child favored by God.

Jennings (my mother’s paternal line)
English—Of early medieval English origin, this surname is also associated with Wales and Ireland. It is a patronymic surname, deriving from the given name Janyn or Jenyn, meaning little John. John itself derives from the Hebrew name Yochanan, meaning Jehovah has favored (me with a son).

Jiménez (my mother’s paternal line)
Spanish—This surname is of Iberian origin, first appearing in the Basque lands. It is a patronymic construction from the modern-styled given name Jimeno, plus the Spanish suffix -ez, meaning son [of]. The root appears to stem from Basque semen, meaning son.

Johnson (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line, two lines)
English—This surname is a patronymic form of the medieval male given name John (son of John) from the Hebrew name Yochanan, meaning God has favored me (with a son).

Johnston (my father’s paternal line)
Scottish—This surname is of Scottish locational origin from an area in Annandale, Dumfriesshire. The founder of the family, named Jonis, followed his overlords from Yorkshire circa 1174 and was granted the lands to which he gave his name. The second element is the medieval English word tone or toun from the Old English pre-7th Century word tun, meaning a settlement.

Jones (my mother’s maternal line and my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is of English medieval origins. It derives either from the male given name John or its female equivalent Joan, both introduced after the Norman Conquest. Both names are written as Jon(e) in medieval documents; a clear distinction between them on the grounds of gender was not made until the 15th Century. However, because of the patronymic nature of  medieval Britain, bearers of the surname Jones are more likely to derive it from John than Joan. John is from the Hebrew word Yochanan, meaning Jehovah has favored (me with a son).

Judd (my mother’s paternal line)
English—Of early medieval English origin, this surname is a diminutive forms of the personal name Jordan. There are two possible sources: it might be an Old German personal name Jordanes, thought to contain the same root as the Old Norse word jordh, meaning land, or it might be taken directly from the name of the river Jordan, derived from the Hebrew word yarad, meaning to go down or to descend (to the Dead Sea). Returning Crusaders and pilgrims would frequently bring back flasks of water from the river Jordan to be used in the baptism of their children, since John the Baptist had baptized people, including Christ Himself, in the river.

 

Well, that’s it for the I and J surnames… Next up is the K surnames.


For more information on the origins of many surnames, check out Almwch Data, Behind the Name, Irish Origenes, Surname Database, Surname Meanings and Origins, Surname Web, and Wiktionary.

#etymology     #familytree     #surnames

Categories: Cole-Marriner Line, Extended Families, Harwick-Bush Line, Spangler-Kenney Line, Surnames from A to Z, Watts-Stark Line, Williams-Stott Line | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

George Thadeous Bush

On this day, 2 May 1904, George Thadeous Bush died in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. He was my spouse’s 2nd great-grandfather.

George Thadeous Bush was born on 25 January 1856, in Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. He was the first-born child of David Byron Bush and Jane Timblin, who were married on 16 November 1854, in Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

Together, his parents would have 10 known children (from eldest to youngest): George Thadeous, Hester Ann, James Clark, Elizabeth Catharine, Margaret E., Ida Eva, Jacob L., Samuel, John M., and Byron Joseph.

On 22 August 1860, five-year old George Thadeous Bush was residing with his parents, sister Hester, and brother James in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. His father was a farmer, and his mother was a housewife. The value of the farm was estimated at $400, and the value of their personal property was estimated at $170. Also residing with them was a 12-year old male named Madison Ayres. As the name Ayres is not a known family surname, perhaps this boy was a farm hand.

On 27 July 1870, George Thadeous Bush, now 15-years old, was residing with his parents and siblings in Canoe Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. His father was a blacksmith, and his mother was a housewife. Their real estate was estimated at $500, and their personal property was estimated at $200.

On 31 December 1877, George Thadeous Bush married Mary Ann “Anna” Roush in Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 21 June 1879, daughter Bertha May Bush was born in Perry Township, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania.

On 5 June 1880, George Thadeous Bush was residing with his wife and daughter in Perry Township, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. Also living with him was his 13-year old sister Eva. George was employed as a farm laborer, possibly working at his father-in-law Samuel D. Roush’s farm next-door.

On 5 November 1880, George and Mary Ann welcomed another daughter to the world, Laura V. Bush.

On 26 May 1882, daughter Nora Ella Bush was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 29 Apr 1884, daughter Margaret “Maggie” Bush was born.

Then, on 11 December 1885, after four girls, a son named Albert Leroy Bush as born.

He was followed two years later by son Samuel Elmer Bush, who was born 30 March 1887, in Covode, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 15 March 1889, daughter Myrtle Blanche Bush (my spouse’s great-grandmother) was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

The next child to be born to George and Mary Ann was a daughter Lillie Bush, who arrived on 17 August 1890. Sadly, she died that same day.

On 24 September 1891, they were blessed with another daughter, Lula “Lulu” Mabel Bush.

On 11 August 1893, daughter Effie Alean Bush was born in Rayne Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 31 October 1895, son Arthur Klock Bush was born in Covode, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 12 October 1897, son Murray Miles Bush was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 7 June 1900, George Thadeous Bush, his wife, and their 11 of their children were residing on their farm in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 30 May 1901, his namesake George Thadeous Bush, Jr. was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. On 28 February 1902, a few months before his first birthday, baby George died.

After 13 children, with two dying as infants, one would think that George and Mary Ann might be apprehensive about having any other children. However, that was not the case. On 10 October 1903, the couple welcomed son Charles “Chuck” Franklin Bush to the family. He would be their final child.

Sometime in late April 1904, George Thadeous Bush contracted pneumonia, and on 2 May 1904, he died. He was only 48 years old. He left behind his parents. nine siblings, his wife, and 12 children.

George Thadeous Bush was buried at Covode Presbyterian Cemetery, Indiana County, Pennsylvania, near his babies Lillie and George.

#ancestry     #familyhistory     #genealogy

Categories: Harwick-Bush Line, On This Day | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mary (McHenry) Croasmun

On 30 April 1878, Mary (McHenry) Croasmun died in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. She was my spouse’s 4th great-grandmother.

Mary McHenry was born on 12 February 1799, in East Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. She was the third of eight children born to James McHenry and Elizabeth Stuchell, who were married in 1795 in Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 27 July 1812, when Mary was only 13 years old, her father James McHenry died. He was only 37 years old. (Incidentally, both of James’ parents died in 1812, as well. Perhaps there was a pervasive sickness that went through their community that year?) With James’ death, Elizabeth (Stuchell) McHenry was left to raise eight children on her own.

On 15 July 1819, Mary McHenry married Asa Croasmun in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Asa was the son of Asa Croasmun and Patience Oliver.

On 22 February 1822, daughter Mary Martha Croasmun (my spouse’s 3rd great-grandmother) was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 8 March 1824, son Isaac Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 9 April 1826, son Nathan Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 1 October 1828, son Asa Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

In 1830, Mary, her husband Asa, one daughter between the age 5-10 (Mary Martha), one son between the age 5-10 (Issac), and two sons under the age of 5 (Nathan and Asa) were residing in Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 10 September 1831, son Miles Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 10 September 1834, James W. Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 25 August 1836, son William Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

In 25 April 1842, daughter Elizabeth Jane Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 4 October 1850, Mary, her husband Asa, and seven of their children still were living on their farm in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. At the time, the farm was valued at $5,000. Also living with them was Asa’s sister-in-law Mary Croasmun, a widow at the age of 27, and her daughter Eliza, age 6.

In 1851, Mary (McHenry) Croasmun lost her mother, Elizabeth (Stuchell) McHenry. As painful as the loss of a parent is, nothing would compare to the sadness Mary would soon incur.

On 25 January 1853, tragedy struck the Croasmun family. Son William Croasmun died in Hamilton, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. He was 16 years old.

On 15 August 1860, Mary, her husband Asa, their son Miles, and their daughter Elizabeth were still residing on their farm in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. By now, the property was worth $11,500, and their personal property was valued at $1,310. Sons Issac and Asa and their families lived a few doors down.

On 19 February 1864, Mary’s husband Asa Croasmun died in Hamilton, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. He was 69 years old. Asa was buried at White Church Cemetery, in Hamilton, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania.

On 4 August 1870, Mary (McHenry) Croasmun was residing with her son Miles on his farm (what once was his father’s farm) in North Mahoning, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 30 April 1878, at the age if 79 years, Mary (McHenry) Croasmun died in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. She was buried beside her husband at White Church Cemetery, in Hamilton, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania.

#ancestry     #familyhistory     #genealogy

Categories: Harwick-Bush Line, On This Day | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

ABCs & Our Family Trees: Letter H

h-flower-fairy

I have always been fascinated by language, specifically where it originates and how it adapts, mutates, and relates to other languages. That is why I found the recent series of blogs by Andrew’s Kindred so intriguing. It combined my love of etymology with my love of genealogy.  I was so inspired, in fact, that I decided to try my hand at chronicling the origins of our families’ surnames.


This is the eighth installment of a series of posts documenting the etymology of many of our families’ surnames (recent and distant, direct and indirect.)

Now that the G names have been discussed, next up is the letter H:

Hægis (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
German—This topographic name might be derived from the Middle High German word hac and from the Middle Dutch word haghe or hæg, meaning enclosure, meadow, or hedge. It also might come from the Old Dutch word hægtes or hægtis, which is a supernatural figure much like a witch or Fury.

Häger (my father’s maternal line)
German—This surname originally is derived from hag, meaning hedge or enclosure, and is a topographic name for someone who lived by a hedged or fenced enclosure. Sometimes, it was used as nickname for a thin man, from the Middle High German word, hager, meaning thin or  gaunt.

Haie (my mother’s paternal line)
English—The surname Haie was first found in Normandy, where this family held a family seat in the castle and barony of Lahaie-du-Puits in the arrondissement of Coutance from about the year 890. But the annals of the family only start about 1066, when Eudo de Lahaie accompanied William the Conqueror in the Norman Conquest of England. The de la Haie family occupied the areas in and around Sussex, Essex, and Suffolk.

Haliburton (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is of pre-7th Century origins. It is a locational name from the village of Halberton in Devonshire. This is recorded as Halsbretone in the Domesday Book of 1086 and as Hauberton in the 1188 Pipe Rolls of the county. The placename derives from the elements haesel, meaning hazel; bearu, meaning the grove; and tun, meaning a village or homestead; hence, the surname means homestead by a hazel grove.

Hall (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line and my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname, generally is considered to be Anglo-Scottish origin, has several possible sources. It might be a topographical name for someone who lived at or near a large house called a hall, or that it could be an occupational name for a person who was employed at such a place. In this case, the derivation can be either from the Old English pre-7th Century word heall, the Old German and later Anglo-Saxon word halla, or even the Old Norse-Viking word holl. All have the same meaning of a large house or building. However, it could also be a locational surname from the villages of Hall in the counties of Carmarthenshire, Lancashire, and Roxburghshire.

Halm (my father’s paternal line)
German—This surname is a metonymic occupational name for a maker of hats or helmets from the Anglo-Saxon word helm, meaning helmet.

Halstead (my mother’s paternal line)
English—The origin of this surname is locational from places in Essex, Kent, Leicester, and in early Yorkshire. It is derived from the Old English elements (ge)heald, a shelter or stable for animals, and stede, a place or building, thus a place of shelter for cattle.

Hamilton (my spouse’s mother’s maternal line)
English—Of Anglo-Saxon origin, this is a locational name from any of the various places throughout England. The name is derived from the Old English pre-7th Century words hamel, meaning bare/scarred/treeless, and dun, meaning hill.

Hammerton (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is locational, usually from the villages of Hamerton near Huntingdon, Kirk and York. The place names according to Ekwall’s Dictionary of English Place Names mean the village on the rock, derived from the pre-7th Century word hamor, meaning a rocky mound. This description may loosely apply to Green Hammerton, which is on a slight escarpment, but both the Huntingdon Hamerton and Kirk Hammerton are on level ground. This suggests that the derivation instead was derived from the word hamm, meaning flat.

Hammond (my father’s maternal line)
English—This surname could be of Norman origin from a personal name Hamo(n), which is generally from a continental Germanic name Haimo, derived from the word haim, meaning home. It could also be from the Old Norse personal name Hámundr, composed of the elements hár, meaning high, and mund, meaning protection.

Hanisko (my stepfather’s family)
Slovak—This surname is probably locational in origin, referring to one of two villages in eastern Slovakia by the name of Haniska. The first village in the Košice-okolie District, and the second is in the Prešov District.

Hanson (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
English—This surname can be either a patronymic or a metronymic, meaning it may be derived from the name of the first bearer’s father or mother. As a patronymic, it derives from “Han(n)”, a Flemish form of John from the Hebrew Yochanan, meaning Jehovah has favored (me with a son). Hann(e) was a very popular Christian name in 13th Century Yorkshire, appearing frequently in the 1274-1297 Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield.

Hare (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname was most likely derived from the Old English pre-7th Century word hara, meaning a hare or rabbit; hence, this would be a nickname either for a fast runner or someone with stamina The name could also be topographical from the Old English word haer, meaning stony ground.

Harman (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—This English comes from mainly the southeast area of the country. Introduced by the Normans after the Conquest, this surname is derived from the Germanic word heer, meaning army, and mann, meaning man.

Harrington (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This is a locational surname from places in Cumbria, Lincolnshire, and Northamptonshire. This surname might have been derived from the Old English word hæring, meaning stony place, or haring, meaning gray wood, plus the word tun, meaning settlement

Hartley (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This is a locational surname for someone who resided in Hartley, Devon, Hampshire, or Kent. It is derived from the Old English word heorot, meaning hart or stag, plus the word leah, meaning wood or clearing.

Haslep (my mother’s maternal line)
English—A variation of the Haslip or Hyslop surname, this surname is derived from the Old English word hæsel, meaning hazel, plus the word hop, meaning enclosed valley or hollow between two hills.

Hasslerin (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
German—This is a topographic name for someone who lived in a place where hazels grew, from Middle High German word hasel, meaning hazel; plus  the suffix -er, denoting an inhabitant; plus the suffix -in  which denotes the feminine (e.g. female surname Mayerin—the wife of Mayer.)

Hastings (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname might be derived from the Old English tribal name Hæstingas, meaning Hæsta’s people or the family/followers of Hæsta, which was later transferred to their settlement. Another possible origin might be a patronymic surname derived from the Anglo-Norman personal name Hasten(c) or Hastang.

Hatton (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line and my mother’s paternal line)
English—Mainly from the Lancashire area, this locational name from any of the various places named Hatton. This name is derived from the Old English word hæþ, meaning heath or heather, plus the word tun, meaning enclosure or settlement.

Hauer (my spouse’s stepmother’s family)
German—This surname is derived from the Middle High German word houwer (an agent derivative of houwen, meaning to chop. It is an occupational name for a woodcutter, a butcher, or a stonemason.

Hawes/Haws (my mother’s paternal line and my brother-in-law’s family)
English—This surname has at least a couple of possible origins,. The first is locational from the word hause, meaning a neck of land or a place for gathering animals. The second possibility is as a medieval patronymic from of the name Haw, the diminutive form of Hawkin or Havekin, which are derived from the Old English pre-7th Century word hafoc, meaning hawk.

Hay/Hayes (my mother’s paternal line—three lines)
Scottish—This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from any one of a number of places called Hayes. It is derived from the Old English pre-7th Century word haes, meaning brushwood or underwood.

Heckendorn (my stepfather’s family)
German—This topographic name is composed of Middle High German word hecke, meaning hedge or fence; plus the genitive suffix -n; plus the word dorn, meaning thorn, Combined this forms the Middle High German word heckedorn, meaning hawthorn.

Heimbach (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
German—This is a habitational surname from one of the German towns named Heimbach. The word heim means home.

Hendrickson/Hendriksen (my mother’s maternal line)
Dutch—Hendrik is the Dutch equivalent to Henry, so this surname translates into Henry’s son.

Herwig (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
German—This surname is composed of the Germanic/Dutch elements heri or hari, meaning army, and wig, meaning war.

Hepburn (my mother’s paternal line)
Scottish—Although commonly a Scottish name, this surname’s origins lie in the north of England. Specifically, the name is thought to have derived from either the town of Hebron in Northumberland or Hebburn in Tyne and Wear. The origins of the name are suggested to be the same as that of Hebborne from the Old English words heah, meaning high, and byrgen, meaning burial mound. Alternatively, it might be a high place beside the water, as the word burn in Northumbria and Scotland means stream.

Hesketh (my mother’s paternal line)
Scottish—This surname is a habitational name from places in Lancashire and North Yorkshire called Hesketh or from Hesket in Cumbria, all derived from the Old Norse words hestr, meaning horse or stallion, and skeið, meaning race course. The ancient Scandinavians were fond of horse racing and brought it with them to the British Isles.

Hess (my father’s paternal line)
German—This surname is believed to have originally described people who came from the region known as Hesse. The translation of this name is the hooded people; whether this referred to people who made hoods and other garments such as coats and cloaks, whether they habitually wore such clothing; or whether hesse is a transposed meaning, perhaps for warriors who wore a particular type of helmet like a hood, is uncertain.

Hill (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line and my brother-in-law’s family)
English—This surname is extremely common and widely distributed topographic name for someone who lived on or by a hill from the Middle English word hill and Old English word hyll.

Hingston (my mother’s maternal line)
English— This is a habitational surname from any of three places so named. Hingston, Cornwall and Hingston Down in Moretonhampstead, Devon are both derived from the Old English word hengest, meaning stallion, plus the Old English word dun, meaning hil’, whereas the Hingston in Bigbury, Devon is derived from the Old English word hind, meaning a young doe, plus the word stan, meaning stone.

Hitch (my mother’s paternal line)
English—The etymology of this surname might be from the Middle English words hytchen or icchen, meaning to move as with a jerk. The surname Hitch is of uniquely English origin, referring refer to a geographical area called the Hitchins and Hecheham. People living in the vicinity came to be called by their given name with an added suffix meaning of Hitchins or “of Hitch” for short.

Hockensmith (my stepfather’s family)
German—This surname is the Americanized form of German surname, Hackenschmidt, an occupational name for a maker of hoes and axes. This surname is derived from the Middle High German words hacke, meaning hoe or axe, and smit, meaning smith.

Hoffman (my stepfather’s family)
German—The original meaning in medieval times was steward—one who manages the property of another. The word hof means farmyard or courtyard, while the word mann means man, so this could also be an occupational surname for a farmer.

Holand/Holland (my mother’s paternal line, two lines)
English—This is a habitational name from Holland, a division of Lincolnshire, derived from the Old English words hoh, meaning ridge, and land, meaning land.

Hollingsworth (my father’s maternal line)
English—This is a habitational surname from places in Cheshire and Lancashire called Hollingworth, derived from Old English words hole(g)n, meaning holly, and worð, meaning enclosure.

Holmes (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
Scottish—This is probably a habitational surname from Holmes near Dundonald or from a place so called in the barony of Inchestuir. It might also be a topographic name for someone who lived on an island, in particular a piece of slightly raised land lying in a fen or partly surrounded by streams. If this were the case, then this surname might be derived from the Middle English and Middle Low German word holm or the Old Norse word holmr. The Middle English word holm is a variant of holin, which means holly.

Holt (my mother’s maternal line)
English—This surname is topographical, derived from the Old English word holt, which means forest, wood, grove, thicket; wood. It is more common in the Lancashire area than elsewhere.

Holway (my mother’s maternal line, two lines)
English—The roots of the Anglo-Saxon surname are derived from the Old English word hol, meaning hole or hollow, and the Middle English word wei or wai or the Old English word weġ, all meaning the way or path.

Hoo (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—In East Anglia and England, this might be a topographic name for someone who lived on a spur of a hill, derived from the Old English word hoe or hoh, meaning spur of a hill. The surname may also derive from any of the minor places named with this word, such as Hoo in Kent and Hooe in Devon and Sussex. It might also be derived from the Middle English word hoo or Old English word hēo, both meaning she.

Hooper (my father’s paternal line)
English—This is an occupational surname for someone who fitted wooden or metal hoops on wooden casks and barrels, from the Middle English word hoop, meaning hoop or band.

Horner (my brother-in-law’s family)
English—This is an occupational name for someone who made or sold small articles made of horn, a metonymic occupational name for someone who played a musical instrument made from the horn of an animal, or a topographic name for someone who lived at a horn of land.

Houghton (my brother-in-law’s family)
English—A habitational surname derived from the Old English words hoh, meaning ridge or spur (literally ‘heel’) and tun, meaning enclosure or settlement. In Lancashire and South Yorkshire, the first element is derived from the Old English word halh, meaning nook or recess.

Howland (my mother’s paternal line)
English—Of Anglo-Saxon origin, this locational surname comes from any one of the various places in England called Holland or Hoyland in Essex, Lancashire, Lincolnshire, and Yorkshire. All these places share the same meaning and derivation—land on or by a ridge, derived from the Old English words hoh, meaning ridge or spur/heel, and land, meaning land.

Hüber/Huber (my father’s paternal line)
Swiss—This is a status surname based on the Middle High German word huobe, meaning a measure of land varying in size at different periods and in different places but always of considerable extent, appreciably larger than the holding of the average peasant. The surname usually denotes a prosperous small farmer and probably one of the leading men of his village.

Hudson (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This interesting Anglo-Scottish surname is a patronymic. It derives from the personal name Hudde, which might be a nickname form of the pre-7th Century Old Saxon name Hugh, meaning mind or heart. Hudde might also be a nickname form of the Germanic and French Ricard or Richard. Finally, it might be from the Old English personal name Huda, which gave its name to places such as Huddington in Worcestershire. In England, Hudson is especially popular in Yorkshire.

Huey (my spouse’s stepmother’s family)
Flemish—In general the spelling as Huey derives from the French-Flemish Huguenot Hue, Huet, and Hughe, from the areas of Bruges, Normandy, and Tournaise and all originating from the pre-7th Century Old Saxon name Hugh, meaning mind or heart

Hüffer/Huffer (my father’s paternal line)
Swiss—From the Germanic personal name Hugifrid, this surname is composed of the word hug, meaning head, mind, spirit, and the word frid, meaning peace. It was a status name for a prosperous small farmer.

Huggart (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
German—This surname’s origins are unknown. Perhaps it is of Norse origin from the word huggert, meaning cutlass—a short sword with a curved blade. The Old Norse word hǫgg means slash, stroke, cut, as does the Danish word hugge.

Hugh/Hughes (my spouse’s mother’s maternal line and my mother’s paternal line)
Welsh/English—From the Old French personal name Hu(gh)e, introduced to Britain by the Normans, derived from the Germanic word hug, meaning head, mind, spirit. Hughes is the patronymic form from the Middle English and Anglo-Norman French personal name Hugh.

Hull (my mother’s maternal line)
English—This surname has a number of possible origins. It might be of English locational origin from one of the places thus called in Cheshire, Somerset, and East Riding, Yorkshire. The derivation is from the Old English pre-7th Century word hyll, meaning hill. It might also be a topographical name for a dweller on or by a hill. The sound represented by the Old English “y” developed in various ways in the different dialects of Middle English and in the west and central Midlands, it became a “u”, thus the spelling hull evolved.

Hunter (my spouse’s mother’s maternal line)
English—This ancient surname is of Anglo-Scottish origins, derived from the Old English pre-7th Century word hunta, meaning to hunt, with the agent suffix -er, meaning one who does or works with. The term was used not only of hunters on horseback of game such as stags and wild boars but also as a nickname for bird catchers and poachers.

Hurst (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname might have been for someone who lived on a wooded hill, from the Old English word hyrst. Or, this surname might be locational from one of the places named Hurst/Hirst in Berkshire, Kent, Northumberland, Somerset, Warwickshire, Northumberland. or West Yorkshire.

Hussey (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
English—This surname might be of Norman origin and be locational from Houssaye, a place in Seine-Maritime, whose name is derived from the Old French word hous, meaning holly. Hosie might also be a nickname, a derivation from the Old French word h(e)use, meaning booted, originally denoting someone who wore boots of an unusual design, or it might derive from the Old English pre-7th Century word hus(e)wif, indicating a woman in charge of her own household.

Hutchinson (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is a patronymic and diminutive form of the original personal name Hugh, a Norman-French name with pre-7th Century Old German origins. It is derived from the word hug, meaning heart or soul, plus the additives kin, meaning close relative, and -son, meaning son of.

Well, that’s it for the H surnames… Next up is a two-for-one special…the I and J surnames.


For more information on the origins of many surnames, check out Almwch Data, Behind the Name, Irish Origenes, Surname Database, Surname Meanings and Origins, Surname Web, and Wiktionary.

#etymology     #familytree     #surnames

Categories: Cole-Marriner Line, Extended Families, Harwick-Bush Line, Noel-Ardinger Line, Spangler-Kenney Line, Surnames from A to Z, Taylor-Thomas Line, Watts-Stark Line, Williams-Stott Line | Tags: , , , , , | 3 Comments

ABCs & Our Family Trees: Letter G

I have always been fascinated by language, specifically where it originates and how it adapts, mutates, and relates to other languages. That is why I found the recent series of blogs by Andrew’s Kindred so intriguing. It combined my love of etymology with my love of genealogy.  I was so inspired, in fact, that I decided to try my hand at chronicling the origins of our families’ surnames.


This is the seventh installment of a series of posts documenting the etymology of many of our families’ surnames (recent and distant, direct and indirect.)

Now that the F names have been discussed, next up is the letter G:

Gallion (my mother’s paternal line)
French—A nickname derived from the Old French word galier, meaning a man with a cheerful disposition.  

Gallelli (my spouse’s father’s paternal line)
Italian—This nickname surname derives either from the fact that the original name holders were men who prided themselves on being snappy dressers and leaders of the flock or were known for their sexual prowess. This surname is derived from the Latin word gallus, meaning a cock bird.

Gambon (my mother’s maternal line)
French—This surname is derived from the Anglo-Norman French word gambon, meaning ham, which comes ultimately from a Norman-Picard form of the Old French word jambe, meaning leg.

36cbd82d25c17d6e53e54613dd900dcbGarner (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is of early medieval English origin and has three possible sources. First, it might be topographical for someone who lived near a barn or granary or an occupational name for someone who was in charge of the storehouse for corn, the granary,. It is derived from the Anglo-Norman French word gerner and Old French word gernier—both from the Late Latin word granarium or granum, meaning grain or corn. Second, it might be from a central Old French form of a Germanic personal name composed of the elements war(in), meaning guard, and heri or hari, meaning army. The third source is a contracted variant from the English occupational name Gardener, which was normally given to a cultivator of edible produce in an orchard or kitchen garden, rather than to a tender of ornamental lawns and flower beds.

Gay (my mother’s paternal line)
English—There are two possible origins for this surname, both French. The first is a nickname bestowed on a lighthearted, joyful, or cheerful person from the Old French word gai and Middle English word gai(e), meaning full of joy. The second possible origin is locational, where the surname derives from any of the places in Normandy called Gaye, such as that in La Manche, where the name of the place is derived from an early owner bearing a Germanic personal name beginning Wai or Gai.

Geary (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is derived from the pre-7th Century Anglo-Saxon and Olde German word geri or gari, meaning spear. This might have described a soldier who carried such a weapon, or it might simply by a personal name at a time when any name which extolled war and weaponry was greatly treasured. Another possibility is that the name derives from the medieval English word geary, meaning fickle or capricious.

ornateg_250George (my spouse’s stepmother’s family)
English—This notable surname is of Ancient Greek origins. Deriving from the word georgios, meaning farmer, the name was used in Europe throughout the early Christian period, being associated with a martyr killed at Nicomedia in the year 303. The popularity of the name increased during the Crusades, when it became the practice for returning crusaders and pilgrims to name their children after from the Old Testament.

Gifford (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname might originate from the Old French word giffard, used as a nickname for someone thought to be chubby-cheeked. This is a derivative of the German word giffel, meaning cheek.

Gibson (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This notable surname is a form of the medieval nickname Gib, a shortened form of the personal name Gilbert, which was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest. The Norman name was originally Gislebert or Gillebert and is composed of the Germanic elements gisil, meaning hostage or noble youth, and berht, meaning bright or famous.

Gillespie (my brother-in-law’s family)
Irish— This surname is of pre-10th Century Gaelic origin. It derives from giolla easpuig, meaning bishop’s servant.

Gillis (my mother’s paternal line)
Scotland—This surname is of pre-Christian, Ancient Greek origin. It is a shortened form of aegidius, meaning a wearer of goatskin—a reference to a holy man or somebody who did good works. St. Giles (originally Aegidius) left Greece to become a hermit in France. It is said that his Greek name was turned into Gidie, then Gide, and finally Gilles. St. Giles is regarded as the patron of beggars and cripples. The name was introduced into England and Scotland by the Normans with the names Gilo and Ghilo appearing in the Domesday Book of 1086.

Gisler (my father’s paternal line)
Swiss—A variant of Geisler surname, this is an occupational name for a goatherd from an agent derivative of the Middle High German word geiz, meaning goat. 

ornate_letter_g_small_square_tile-r955488faddf54d31a58d28737ba0a041_agtk1_8byvr_324Gingerich (my father’s paternal line)
Swiss—The Americanized form of Swiss German surname Güngerich, derived from a Germanic personal name formed with the word gund, meaning battle, and ric, meaning power(ful).  

Gleason (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line)
English—This developed from the Irish name O’Glasain, which originated in County Cork. Glasain derives from the Gaelic word glas, meaning green as in inexperienced as opposed to the color.

Goble (my brother-in-law’s family)
English—Of medieval origin, this surname is a dialectal variant of Godbold, itself from a Norman personal name Godebald. It is composed of the Germanic elements god, meaning good, or got, meaning god, along with bald, meaning bold or brave.

g_monogram_silver_besque_ceramic_tile-r75f7ad749bc84aeb97ea3748d761c58d_agtbm_8byvr_324Goess/Goss (my spouse’s mother’s maternal line)
German—This is derived from the personal name Gozzo, a shortened form of the various compound names with the element god, meaning good, or got, meaning god.

Good (my father’s paternal line)
English—This is medieval surname which seems to originate from the pre-7th Century Old English word god, meaning good. This could be a nickname for a good person—someone who was pious and respected, although given the humor of that time, it could possibly be the opposite.

Goodman (my mother’s paternal line)
English—First, this surname might be a status name to describe the head of a household. As such, it derives from the Old English word god, meaning good, and -man, indicating head of. In Scotland, the name described a landowner. Finally, it might be of pre-7th Century Anglo-Saxon origin. If so, it is derived from the personal name Guethmund, which is composed of the elements gueth, meaning battle, and mund, meaning protection.

manuscript-letter-g-illuminated-ancient-ornate-irish-manuscripts__04320-1446307946-500-750Goodspeed (my brother-in-law’s family)
English—This surname derives from the Medieval English phrase God spede, meaning may god prosper [you]—a wish for success said to one setting out on an excursion or enterprise.

Gordon/Gordun (my mother’s paternal line and my brother-in-law’s family)
Scottish—This surname is of locational origin. It is Scottish from Gordon in Berwickshire and is derived from the Old Gaelic word gor, meaning large or spacious, plus the word dun, meaning fort.

Gorham (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This is a very old locational surname might have originated from the lost village of Gorehambury, near the town of St. Albans in Hertfordshire. The derivation is from the pre-7th Century Old English word gor, meaning muddy, and ham, meaning farm or homestead.

ornate-letter-gGraf/Groff (my father’s paternal line)
German—This Middle High German surname comes from the word grave or grabe, a title for aristocratic dignitaries and officials. In later times, it became established as a title of nobility equivalent to count. It also denoted minor local functionaries in different parts of Germany. Third, it might be an occupational name for a servant or retainer of a count,. Finally, it could be a nickname for someone who puts on airs.

Gowdy (my mother’s paternal line)
Scottish—This surname is one of the variant forms of the surname Goldie and reflects the phonetic spelling of the popular pronunciation of that name. Goldie is itself a diminutive form of the surname Gold, which is derived from the Old English pre-7th Century personal name Gold(a) or Golde, from gold, the metal.

Graham (my mother’s paternal line)
Scottish—Although now widely associated with Scotland, this distinguished surname is of Anglo-Saxon origins. It was a locational name originally from the town of Grantham in Lincolnshire and as such recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as both Graham and Grandham. The translation might be the combination of the word ham, meaning homestead, and the Old English pre-7th Century word grand, meaning gravel.

87daa65575e21cf494e0604873abb900Graves (my brother-in-law’s family)
English—This is an occupational name for a steward, from the Middle English word greyve, itself derived from the Old Norse word greifi and the Low German word greve.

Gray/Grey (my mother’s paternal line—four different branches—and my mother’s maternal line)
English—This ancient name has two possible origins, the first of which is an Anglo-Saxon nickname for someone with grey hair or a grey beard, derived from the Old English pre-7th Century word graeg, meaning grey. The second origin is locational from a place called Graye in Calvados, Normandy, derived from the Old Gallo-Roman word gratus, meaning welcome or pleasing.

Grimes (my spouse’s stepfather’s family)
English—This surname has Norse-Viking pre-7th Century origins and is probably from the personal name Grimr, which appears in the Old Danish and Old Swedish name, Grim. It was very popular in those areas of England influenced by Scandinavian settlements. The Norse word was equivalent to the Old English word grima, meaning mask, It was one of the names given to the god Woden. As such, it might mean masked person or shape-changer, and the name was given to boys to encourage the god’s protection.

fancy_letter_g_postcard-r53440ba3f47e4157876960e44059a6fb_vgbaq_8byvr_324-1Günthardt (my father’s paternal line)
Swiss—This surname was found in the canton of Zürich prior to the 1800s. It might be derived from the German word gund, meaning battle, and hardt, a topographic name for someone who lived by woods or pasture, or from the Middle High German words hart or hard, meaning hardy/brave/strong.

Guiscard (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is a variation of the Norman French name Wischard, formed of the Old Norse elements viskr, meaning wise, and hórðr, meaning brave or hardy.

Gullett (my brother-in-law’s family)
English— It is thought that this surname might have also been originally spelled as Gullick. The Gullick surname originated from the pre-7th Century compound personal name Gotlac—derived from the word god, meaning good, and the suffix -lac, meaning mean play or sport (or possibly lake).

Well, that’s it for the G surnames… Next up are the H surnames.


For more information on the origins of many surnames, check out Almwch Data, Behind the Name, Irish Origenes, Surname Database, Surname Meanings and Origins, Surname Web, and Wiktionary.

#etymology     #familytree     #surnames

Categories: Caimi-Culatina Line, Cole-Marriner Line, Extended Families, Harwick-Bush Line, Surnames from A to Z, Taylor-Thomas Line, Watts-Stark Line, Williams-Stott Line | Tags: , , , , | 4 Comments

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