Immigrant Ancestors

Gateway Ancestor: Peter Worden

When tracing ancestors across the centuries, kin are often clustered together in a similar locations, an economic situation, or an ethnic identity.  A gateway ancestor is anyone with known or traceable ancestry from one specific group who marries into another group. Each immigrant from one country to another is a potential gateway, if his/her descendants can then trace his/her ancestry to the original country. Gateways can also occur when someone moves from one distinct social group into another or across distinct religious, economic, or racial barriers.

In the United States, however, the term “gateway ancestor” most commonly is used to refer to colonial immigrants whose ancestry can be traced in the Old World—specifically to gentry, nobility, or royalty. According to Gary Boyd Roberts, author of the book, Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the United States, most Americans with significant New England, Quaker, or Southern plantation ancestry are descended from English, Scottish, Welsh, and French royalty, nobility, or gentry.

Why is that?, you might ask. The reason is primogeniture: the right of succession belonging to the firstborn child, typically the eldest son. Many colonists of high social status were the daughters or younger sons of aristocratic families who came to the New World looking for land because, given their gender or birth order, they could not inherit. At least 650 colonists are known to have traceable royal and noble ancestry; approximately 387 of them had descendants.


Both my family and my spouse’s family have several gateway ancestors.  In the first installment, I gave an overview of Edward Foulke, my spouse’s 8th great-grandfather through his mother’s maternal line.

The second gateway ancestor whom I will introduce is Peter Worden, my 12th great-grandfather through my mother’s maternal line. Through his maternal great-great grandfather, Nicholas Rishton, Peter has been proven to descend several times from Charlemagne, Magna Carta barons, and a couple of saints.

Circa 1569, Peter Worden was born in Clayton-le-Woods, Lancashire, England to Robert Worden (1534–1580) and Isabel Worthington (1547–1580).

Circa 1604, Peter Worden married Margaret (Grice) Wall. She was the widow of Anthony Wall of Chingle Hall, who died sometime between February 1603 and March 1604, according to a 1607 Palatine Chancery Court action. Margaret, born sometime between 1568 and 1572, was the daughter of Thomas Grice and Alice, of Warrington, Lancashire, England.

Together, Peter and Margaret had three children: Elizabeth (born circa 1605); Bridget (born circa 1607); and Peter, my 11th great-grandfather (born circa 1609).

Between 1609 to 1613, Peter Worden (recorded as Peter Werden, gent.) appeared as a juror for nine inquisitions.

In 1612, after only nine years of marriage, Peter Worden’s wife Margaret died. He was left with five stepchildren from Margaret’s previous marriage and three of his own children, with the youngest, Peter, being only about three years old.

Although he was a gentleman, Peter Worden was also a merchant of textiles. His ancestors had acquired Burgess rights, and these rights had been passed down to their progeny. Burgess rights were a valuable asset, necessary for trading purposes. Peter Worden’s name appears in the Preston Guild Roll for 1622. He was listed as being a Foreign Burgess in the records of the town of Preston, just five miles from Clayton. Foreign referred to the fact that he was not a native of the town but an outsider.

Peter Worden held a lease on a shop in Preston’s Moothall, a two-story building approximately 35 feet by 70 feet, housing the town Council chamber and offices on the second floor and businesses on the first. Peter’s shop was next to the stairs at the north end of the building. Early archives list the following mention of Peter’s lease:

Item of Elizabeth Weren widdowe for on shop on the east side of moothall next adjoyning to the staires at the north end of the hall with a standing (open stall) at the south end of the hall formerly demised to Peter Werden by lease dated Primo Oct XVth Jac ye improved yearly rent of L01-15s-00d.

This date would indicate that Peter Worden held a lease on his shop and stand in October 1617.

In 1625, Peter Worden’s daughter Elizabeth bore an illegitimate child, whom she named John Lewis. The child was the product of an adulterous affair she had with John Lewis, a married vicar who was defrocked and debarred either because of this adulterous affair or for some other shenanigans—it seems he was rather good at being bad. A few years later, Elizabeth married Hugh Swansey and had another son, Robert.

On 19 November 1628, Peter Worden’s younger daughter Bridget died. She never married.

About 1628, Peter accepted the office of County Aulnager (or Alnager), “an officer in a port or market town responsible for ensuring that all cloth sold was woven in the correct length and width laid down by statute (standards).” He also was a member of the town council of Preston, Lancashire, England.

Peter Worden was last recorded in Preston on 21 January 1629, when, according to the early archives of Preston Borough, he loaned eight shillings to the Borough for a project concerning common lands.

In 1630, the town of Preston was ravaged by the plague. Prior to the outbreak, the town of Preston had a population of nearly 3,000; however, due of this pandemic, 1,069 residents perished.

In July 1635 in Kirkham, Lancashire, Peter Worden’s elder daughter Elizabeth died.

Circa 1636, Peter Worden, his son Peter, and his grandson John Lewis immigrated to the Colony of Massachusetts.

On 7 January 1638, Peter Worden was listed as “Old Worden” in a list of inhabitants of Yarmouth, Massachusetts. At the time, there were only four men in Yarmouth to whom land grants had been made.

On 5 March 1638, the last will and testament of Peter Worden was proved:

The Last Will and Testament of Peter WORDEN of Yarmouth ye elder, deceased, proved at ye General Court held at Plymouth, the fifth day of March in ye XIIIth year of ye reign of our sovereign Lord Charles, King of England AC1638, by ye oathes of Mr. Nicholas Sympkins, Hugh Tillie & Giles Hopkins as followith, viz “Be it known unto all men to whome this doth or may concern, that I, Peter Worden, of Yarmouth in New England, in Plymouth Patten, being very sick, in this Year of Our Lord 1638 and on ye ninth day of February, do make my last will to testify unto all that I Peter Worden, do give and bequeath unto Peter Worden, my only sonne and heir, and in the presense of Nicholas Sympkins Hugh Tillie and Giles Hopkins, I do make him my whole executor to whom I do give all my lands, leases & tenaments with goods movable and unmovable in the Town of Clayton in the County of Lankcester. Likewise I do give unto Peter my son all my goods which I have at this present in New England. My will is my son is to give John Lewis one nate goat, also my will is my son is to give my grandchild such money as is due for the keeping of goats and calves until this day and that my son is with the money to buy a kid or dispose it otherwise for his use. Also one bed or bolster, three blankets, also my son is to have the tuition of my grandchild until he be at the age of one and twenty years of age, also my will is he shall find him with meat, drink, and clothes and at the three last years of the twenty-one years also to have forty shillings the years after and above, for to add to his stock with the sow pig when the sow pigs — s/Peter WORDEN 1/s.

In March 1639, Peter Worden died in Yarmouth and was buried in Worden Cemetery in Dennis, Massachusetts. And, on 5 March 1639, Peter Worden’s will was probated. (It is interesting to note that Peter Worden’s will was the first one printed in the Plymouth Court Records. A copy of his will is on file in the Barnstable Probate Court.)

#englishhistory    #familyhistory     #genealogy

Categories: Cole-Marriner Line, Immigrant Ancestors, Royal Roots | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Gateway Ancestor: Edward Foulke

When tracing ancestors across the centuries, kin are often clustered together in a similar locations, an economic situation, or an ethnic identity.  A gateway ancestor is anyone with known or traceable ancestry from one specific group who marries into another group. Each immigrant from one country to another is a potential gateway, if his/her descendants can then trace his/her ancestry to the original country. Gateways can also occur when someone moves from one distinct social group into another or across distinct religious, economic, or racial barriers.

In the United States, however, the term “gateway ancestor” most commonly is used to refer to colonial immigrants whose ancestry can be traced in the Old World—specifically to gentry, nobility, or royalty. According to Gary Boyd Roberts, author of the book, Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the United States, most Americans with significant New England, Quaker, or Southern plantation ancestry are descended from English, Scottish, Welsh, and French royalty, nobility, or gentry.

Why is that?, you might ask. The reason is primogeniture: the right of succession belonging to the firstborn child, typically the eldest son. Many colonists of high social status were the daughters or younger sons of aristocratic families who came to the New World looking for land because, given their gender or birth order, they could not inherit. At least 650 colonists are known to have traceable royal and noble ancestry; approximately 387 of them had descendants.


Both my family and my spouse’s family have several gateway ancestors.  The first one whom I will introduce is Edward Foulke, my spouse’s 8th great-grandfather through his mother’s maternal line. Edward Foulke has been proven to descend from Charlemagne, a Magna Carta baron, and even a saint.

Edward ap Foulke was born 13 May 1651 in Llandderfel, Merionethshire, Wales. He was the third son of Foulke ap Thomas (who was also a third son) and Lowry ferch Edward.

“I, Edward Foulke, was the son of Foulke, ap Thomas, ap Evan, ap Thomas, ap Robert, ap David Lloyd, ap David, ap Evan Vaughan (ap Evan), ap Griffith, ap Madoc, ap Ririd Flaidd, Lord of Penllyn, who dwelt at Rhiwaedog. My mother’s name was Lowry, the daughter of Edward, ap David, ap Ellis, ap Robert, of the Parish of Llanvor in Merionethshire.”

In 1682, Edward Foulke married Eleanor Hugh (Eleanor ferch Hugh) in Wales. She was the daughter of Hugh ap Cadwaladr.

“I was born on the 13th of 5th month, 1651, and when arrived at mature age, I married Eleanor, the daughter of Hugh, ap Cadwaladr, ap Rhys, of the Parish of Spytu in Denbighshire; her mother’s name was Gwen, the daughter of Ellis, ap William, ap Hugh, ap Thomas, ap David, ap Madoc, ap Evan, ap Cott, ap Griffith, ap Madoc, ap Einion, ap Meredith of Cai-Fadog; and she was born in the same parish and shire with her husband.

I had, by my said wife, nine children, whose names are as follows: Thomas, Hugh, Cadwalader, and Evan; Grace, Gwen, Jane, Catherine, and Margaret. We lived at a place called Coed y Foel, a beautiful farm, belonging to Roger Price esq., of Rhiwlas, Merionethshire, aforesaid.”

Their nine children, of Coed y Foel, Llandderfel, Merionethshire, Wales, were Thomas (my spouse’s 7th great-grandfather, born 7 August 1783), Jane (born 10 June 1684), Hugh (born 6 July 1685), Margaret (born in 1687), Evan (born circa 1689), Gwen (born circa 1690), Cadwalader (born 13 July 1691), Grace (born circa 1693), and Catherine (born in 1697).

On 17 Jul 1698, Edward and Eleanor Foulke and all their children immigrated to the American Colonies. According to family tradition, the reason for Edward Foulke’s decision to immigrate was formed from his conviction of the hardships and injustice often inflicted upon those subject to a monarchy. Supposedly, he was obligated to attend a military muster or drill. While there, one of his kinsman engaged in an exercise involving a broadsword or other weapon. During this exercise, his kinsman’s kneecap was struck off by his antagonist. The bystanders, as well as the one who had inflicted the injury, showed no remorse; instead, they cheered it. Edward, distressed at his kinsman’s suffering, was shocked to think that this barbarous occurrence was a natural outgrowth of the system under which they lived. His mind turned to the New World as a place of escape; however, he was very reluctant to undertake the difficulty and danger inherent with a long voyage with a large family. He decided to broach the subject with his wife. She, as the tradition holds, regarded his impression as having Divine origin, and while Edward Foulke hesitated and prevaricated, his wife Eleanor contended: “He that revealed this to thee can bless a very little in America to us and can blast a great deal in our native land.”

“But in process of time, I had an inclination to remove with my family to the province of Pennsylvania; and in order thereto, we set out on the 3rd day of the 2nd month, A.D. 1698, and came in two days to Liverpool, where, with divers others who intended to go the voyage, we took shipping, the 17th of the same month, on board the Robert and Elizabeth, and the next day set sail for Ireland, where we arrived, and staid until the first of the 3rd month, May, and then sailed again for Pennsylvania, and were about eleven weeks at sea. And the sore distemper of the bloody flux broke out in the vessel, of which died five and forty persons in our passage; the distemper was so mortal that two or three corpses were cast overboard every day while it lasted. But through favor and mercy of Divine Providence, I, with my wife and nine children, escaped that sore mortality, and arrived safe in Philadelphia, the 17th of the 5th month, July, where we were kindly received and hospitably entertained by our friends and old acquaintances.”

Edward was one of the original settlers of Gwynedd, Pennsylvania, where he purchased and settled on 712 acres of land. His land today would be located in Lower Gwynedd Township, extending approximately from Brushtown Road to Penllyn Pike and from the Whitpain Township line to Sumneytown Pike (except for a small rectangle of 110 acres belonging to Evan ap Hugh). Many of the place names in Gwynedd Township are related to Edward Foulke’s roots.

“I soon purchased a fine tract of land of about seven hundred acres, sixteen miles from Philadelphia, on a part of which I settled, and divers others of our company who came over sea with us, settled near me at the same time. This was the beginning of November 1698, aforesaid, and the township was called Gwynedd, or North Wales.”

In 1702, Edward Foulke wrote about his emigration from Wales (see the quotes above), as well as his lineage. On his father’s side, Edward Foulke traced his ancestry to the 12th century Welsh chieftain, Rhirid Flaidd of Penllyn, whose mottos were blaidd rhudd ar y blaen (red wolf to the front) and consequitur quod conque petit (he attains what he attempts). The coat of arms belonging to Rhirid Flaidd ap Gwergenu was green with a chevron between three boars’ heads, erased argent. These coats of arms were passed down generations later to Edward Foulke.

The book, The Historical Collections Relating to Gwynedd, by Howard M. Jenkins, discusses Rhirid Flaidd:

“This distinguished man, Lord of Penllyn (a cantref containing five parishes north of the Bala Lake), Eifonydd, Pennant, Melangell, and Glyn, in Powis, and, as some say, of eleven towns or trefs in the hundred of Oswestry), has been occasionally described, but erroneously, as founder of one of the fifteen noble tribes of North Wales. At the same time his territories were larger and his influence much more extensive than those of several of the founders of noble tribes. He flourished at the time of Henry II, and his son Richard I. Paternally his descent was from Cynedda Wledig, but maternally it is alleged that his lineage was Norman, his mother being a descendant of Richard, Earl of Avranches, by his son William, whose brother was Hugh Lupus Earl of Chester. Whether Rhirid was called Flaidd “Wolf” from a cognomen of his maternal ancestors or from the possession of a hungry and savage nature, it is not easy to say. His eldest son Madoc had a son, Rhirid Fychan (“Younger” or “Little”), who married into the family of Fychan (Vaughan) of Nannau, and from him were descended the subsequents Vaughans of Nannau and Rhug. From his son David Pothon, who married Cicely, daughter of Sir Alexander Myddleton, Lord of Myddelton, in Shropshire, the Myddletons of Chirk Castle were descended, retaining the maternal name.”

Through his maternal family, Edward Foulke’s lineage spanned back to Edward I of England through Eleanor of England Countess of Bar. This ancestry is documented in Early Friends Families of Upper Bucks, pg. 127. Edward’s lineage to Edward I of England through Joan, who married Gilbert de Clare, is documented in Welsh Settlement of Pennsylvania, pg. 298-300.

Edward Foulke died on 8 January 1741, in Gwynedd, Pennsylvania. Sometime before his death, he wrote this eloquent exhortation to his children:

“My dear children: There has been for a considerable time, something on my mind to say to you by way of advice, before I return to dust, and resign my soul to Him who gave it: though I find some difficulty in delivering my thoughts in writing.

My first admonition to you, is, that you fear the Lord, and depart from evil all the days of your life.

Secondly, as you are brothers and sisters, I beseech you to love one another and your neighbors too. If any of your neighbors injure you, in word or deed, bear it with patience and humility. It is more pleasing in the sight of God and good men, to forgive injuries, than it is to revenge them. Rather pray for them, than wish them any evil: Lest that text in scripture, which requires an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, come into your minds when you leave this world, and you be found wanting. For without doubt, he that is thoughtless and negligent all his days about the welfare of his soul, will some day or another, in the midst of his extremity, call on the rocks and mountains to secure him from the vengeance of an offended God.

My dear children, accustom not yourselves to loose, vain talking, which the scriptures declare against. It was hurtful to me in my youth, and stopped my virtue. The temptations of this world are very powerful, as Job said by experience. Be watchful over your evening conversation. Let pious thoughts possess your souls for the moment before you close your eyes for sleep. If you do that, you will be more likely to find yourselves in the morning in a meek, humble posture before God, who preserved you from evil. This will produce peace and calmness of mind, with a blessing in your outward affairs: as we read of Isaac, whose pious meditations in the field, was rewarded with outward and inward blessings. I desire you not to reject the least appearance of good which may arise in your minds as if it could be obtained at pleasure. Give speedy obedience unto God who begets this diving emotion in your hearts. For a man’s abode in this world is very doubtful. It often happens that death comes without warning: yet we must go whether ready or not — where the tree falls, there it must be. I knew a man in the land of my nativity, that went to bed with his wife at night and died before morning, unknown to her. Such things are designed, I believe, as a warning to us, that we may arm ourselves against the terrors of such a day.

And of such as die after that manner, we have little to say, save that they died and were buried; placing the rest amongst the mysteries of the Almighty. Hence let us take a view of our own weakness, and judge of one another with charity.

I feel sorrow now in my old age, for want of being more careful and circumspect in my youth. Although I did nothing that brought shame on myself, or grief on my parents; yet there was amongst the loose, inconsistent youth, too many things which they called innocent, without considering they were building on the sand; and I was often drawn into vain mirth with them. There is a vast difference between the two sentences, delivered to those who built on the rock, and those who built on the sand. Our Saviour said of the latter, their fall shall be great. Let me entreat you, my dear children, assume not the appearance of religion, without a real possession of it in your hearts. Our Saviour compared such as did so, to sepulchres, white without, but within, full of dead men’s bones. Yet I have better hopes of you, though I mention this.

I have known, at times, something pressing me to read good books, or to go aside in private, to pray: which, if I neglected, and took my liberty other ways, then indifference and hardness would prevail, which deprived me of those good inclinations for a considerable time after. I have also to tell you of my own experience, concerning attending week-day meetings. Whenever I suffered trifling occasions, or my outward affairs, and business, if not urgent, to interrupt my going, a cool reflection and serious view, made me look upon it as a loss or injury done to my better part; and generally, the business done that day, did not answer my expectations of it in the morning.

One thing more comes into my mind, by searching myself; which is, that it had been better for me, if I had been more careful, in sitting with my family at meals, with a sober countenance; because children and servants have eyes and observations on those who have the command and government of them. It has a great influence on the life and manners of youth. So my dear children, perhaps some of you may get some advantage by this. If you consider with attention this innocent simplicity of life and manners I have been speaking of, you need not fear but that God will preserve you in safety from the snares of the devil, and the storms of this inconstant world. By diligence also you shall obtain victory over the deceitfulness of riches. I fear there are too many of this age, who suffer themselves to be carried away with the torrent of corruption. And not only such as content themselves, as it were, in the outward porch; but also such as make greater pretences than those: even they who ere looked upon as pillars in the church, have, I fear, turned their backs upon it. I lay these things close to you, that you may be careful and diligent, whilst you have time left, lest by degrees, indifference creep upon you, under the disguise of an easy mind, and you forget, it is he who holds out to the end shall be saved.

And as for your father and mother, our time is almost come to a period. We have lived together above fifty years, and now in our old age, the Lord is as good and gracious as ever He was. He gives us a comfortable living. Now in the close of our days, we have fresh occasion to acknowledge His benevolence and abounding goodness to us.

Now I think I can with peace of mind conclude, with hopes that your prayers will be for us in the most needful time, especially on a dying pillow, when our time in this world comes to an eternal rest. I conclude in the words of the prophet Jeremiah, “See thee up way marks, make thee high leaps, set thy heart toward the highway, even the way that thou wentest. Turn again, Oh Virgin of Israel, turn again to these thy cities.”

#familyhistory     #genealogy     #welshhistory

Categories: Immigrant Ancestors, Royal Roots, Williams-Stott Line | Tags: , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Sláinte to Our Irish & Scots-Irish Ancestors

slainte

 

Last week, many Americans celebrated St. Patrick’s Day by wearing green, supping on Irish stew and soda bread or corned beef and cabbage, and raising a pint of Guinness or a dram of Jameson’s. (Heck, even non-Irish heritage people “became” Irish for the day!)

According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 39.6 million Americans claim an Irish background (with another five million identifying with a Scots-Irish heritage.)  Wow! That is certainly a lot of people—nearly 15% of the American population!

Seeing the percentage of Americans who claim an Irish heritage, I wondered: How many of our ancestors were Irish?

So I started climbing the branches of our families’ trees and discovered Angel Connell, my 6th great-grandfather through my maternal father’s side, who was born 1754 in County Dublin, Ireland. Angel immigrated to the United States sometime before his 28th year when he married Martha Anne Fleming on 29 April 1782 in Greenbrier County, Virginia (now West Virginia.)

However, I was certain that our combined families had more than one ancestor who emigrated from the Emerald Isle. So I kept scaling the branches and found quite a few people who were labeled Scots-Irish. So, who were the original Scots-Irish, and what was their history prior to coming to the Colonies?

Starting in 1609, Lowland Scots began relocating to the northern counties of Ireland. This resettlement was orchestrated by the English Crown as a way to confiscate the Irish nobles’ lands and to populate the area with Protestant English and Scottish colonists.

During the Irish Rebellion of 1641, the native Irish gentry attempted to extirpate the Scottish and English settlers; between 4,000-6,000 settlers perished between 1641–1642. The Ulster-Scots were probably saved from complete annihilation when, in 1642, the Scottish Covenanters sent an army to Ulster to protect the Scottish settlers from the native Irish landowners.

Under the Act of Settlement of 1652, all Catholic-owned land was confiscated, and the British holdings in Ireland, which had been destroyed by the 1641 rebellion, were restored. However, due to the Scots’ enmity to the English Parliament in the final stages of the English Civil War, English settlers rather than Scots were the main beneficiary of this scheme.

Peace reigned until 1689; however, soon another war broke out—again due to religious differences. The Williamite War (1689–91) was fought between Jacobites, who supported the restoration of the James II (a Catholic) to the English throne, and Williamites, who supported the William of Orange (a Protestant.) In 1691, the Williamite forces defeated the Jacobites, solidifying the Protestant minority’s power in Ireland.

A few years later, in the late 1690s, another major influx of Scots into Northern Ireland occurred, when tens of thousands of Scots left their country due to famine.

The Scottish Presbyterians in the northern Irish counties had endured and survived nearly a century of religious discrimination and would most likely have continued to thrive in the face of this hostility. However, they soon encountered an even greater challenge—one that threatened their economic existence in Ireland. By 1710, most of the farm leases granted to the settlers in the 1690s had expired. New leases were withheld until the tenants agreed to pay astronomically inflated rents, which many Scots tenants could not afford. Rather than submit to these new conditions. entire communities, led by their Presbyterian ministers, left. A new exodus began.

Longing for a homeland without oppression and strife, the promise of the New World beckoned. Between 1717 and 1775, approximately 200,000 Ulster Scots migrated to the American Colonies. The first significant wave occurred in the 1719-1720.

Most Scots-Irish settlers (as they were referred to in the Americas to differentiate them from Irish Catholics) were originally drawn to the unspoiled lands of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia, where they continued their farming traditions. Our ancestors were no exception. In addition, their origins were varied: Scottish, Irish, and even English. Here are the family members who would be classified as Scots-Irish:

John Barnett, born 20 May 1678 in Derry, County Londonderry, Ulster, Northern Ireland and his wife Jeanette Power, born 1682 in County Londonderry, Ulster, Northern Ireland, are my spouse’s 9th great-grandparents on his paternal mother’s side. The Barnetts immigrated to Chester County, Pennsylvania sometime before 1702, as their daughter Ann was born that year in that locale.

John Campbell, born 16 Nov 1674 in County Donegal, Ulster, Northern Ireland, and his wife Grissel Hay, born 1678 in County Antrim, Ulster, Northern Ireland are my 7th great grandparents through my maternal father’s line (via their daughter Margaret). These Campbell kin, John and Grissel (Hay) Campbell, are also my 9th great-grandparents through my maternal father’s line (via their son James). John and Grissel Campbell first came to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1726.

Thomas Gay, was born 1730 in Ulster, Northern Ireland, as were his parents Samuel Gay, born in 1700, and Margaret (surname unknown), born 1700. They are my 7th and 8th great-grandparents on my maternal father’s side. The family arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and then settled in Augusta County, Virginia sometime before 1740.

James Kelly, my spouse’s 6th great-grandfather on his maternal mother’s side, was born 1720 in County Londonderry, Ulster, Northern Ireland and immigrated to Pennsylvania. He spent most of his life in Letterkenny Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania on his 200 acre farm named Londonderry. He sold his land in Letterkenny in 1786 and settled on 200 acres that he had been granted in Conemaugh Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

John Kelsay, my 6th great-grandfather through my maternal father’s side, was born in Ulster, Northern Ireland, and immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1720. In 1748, he married Margaret Campbell, daughter of John and Grissel Campbell (referenced above) in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

James Kenney, my spouse’s 8th great-grandfather on his paternal mother’s side, was born about 1703 in Ulster, Northern Ireland and immigrated to Chester County, Pennsylvania sometime before 1725 when he married Ann Barnett, daughter of John and Jeanette Barnett (referenced above).

Robert Kinkead was born 18 Oct 1768 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ulster, Northern Ireland. He and his parents, David Kinkead, born 1747 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ulster, Northern Ireland and Martha Sproul, born in Omagh, County Tyrone, Ulster, Northern Ireland, my spouse’s 5th and 6th great-grandparents on his maternal father’s side, immigrated to the New World in 1776. They landed in Newark, New Castle County, Delaware, and then migrated to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. As an adult, Robert Kinkead resided in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania.

My spouse’s 4th great-grandparents through his maternal father’s side were Irvin Robinson, born 1762 in Enniskillen, Fermanaugh, Ulster, Northern Ireland and his wife Catharine Elliott, born 1773 in Enniskillen, Fermanaugh, Ulster, Northern Ireland. Irvin Robinson was conscripted to serve in the British Army during the American Revolution and was among the troops who surrendered at Yorktown. In 1793, Irvin Robinson, his wife Catharine, and their children immigrated to the New World, landing in Québec, Canada before traveling to Blair County, Pennsylvania. The family ultimately settled in Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

 

#immigrantancestors     #irishimmigration     #scotsirish

Categories: Harwick-Bush Line, Immigrant Ancestors, Spangler-Kenney Line, Watts-Stark Line, Williams-Stott Line | 2 Comments

Williams-Stott Immigrant Ancestors

williams-stott

We are a nation of immigrants. Most of us descend from others who came to this land whether by their own volition or against their will. With this in mind, I will be documenting all the known immigrant ancestors for both my family and my spouse’s family. This is tenth installment of this series.

***

The final installment in the Immigrant Ancestors series chronicles the known immigrants in the Williams-Stott line, my spouse’s maternal mother’s family.

The most recent know immigrant is Robert Stott, 3rd great-grandfather, born 14 Mar 1833 in Dunkirk, Yorkshire, England.  Next is Joseph Williams, 4th great-grandfather, born 17 Sep 1767 in Wales.

Skipping a couple of generations, the next know immigrant ancestors are William Williams, 6th great-grandfather, born in Wales; James Kelly, 6th great-grandfather, born in Londonderry, Ulster, Ireland; and Johan Georg Goss, 6th great-grandfather, born 6 Mar 1730 in Hanover, Niedersachsen, Germany and his wife Elizabeth Hughlett, 6th great-grandmother, born 5 Dec 1735 in Germany.

Next up are Adam Emenheiser, 7th great-grandfather, born 1723 in Rheinhessen, Hessen Darmstadt, Germany and his wife Anna Margaret Wilhelm, 7th great-grandmother, born 1723 in Germany.

The first set of multi-generational immigrants for this line are Thomas Foulke, 7th great-grandfather, born 1683 in Llandderfel, Merionethshire, Wales and his parents Edward Foulke 8th great-grandfather, born 13 Jul 1651 in Llanderfel, Merionethshire, Wales and Eleanor Hughes, 8th great-grandmother, born 1651 in Denbighshire, Wales.

Other known immigrant ancestors are Jan Broersen Dekker, born 1630 in Husum, København, Denmark and his wife Heyltie Jacobs, born 1635 in Göteborg, Sweden, my spouse’s 10th great-grandparents (twice over, both through their son, Hendrick Janse, and through their daughter, Magdelana); Jacob Luursen Van Kuykendall, 10th great-grandfather, born 1616 in Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands and his wife Styntie Douwes, 10th great-grandmother of wife, born 22 Jan 1617 in Enkhuizen, Noord-Holland, Netherlands; and Aert Pieterson Tach, 10th great-grandfather, born 1633 in Noord-Brabant, Netherlands and his wife Grietje Vooght, 10th great-grandmother, born 1633 in Noord-Brabant, Netherlands.

The second set of multi-generational immigrants for this line are Anthony Jansen Westbroeck, 10th great-grandfather, born about 1636 in Westbroek, Maartensdijk, Utrecht, Netherlands; his wife Orseltie Ursula Dircks, 10th great-grandmother, born in the Netherlands’ along with his parents Cornelius Van Westbroeck, 11th great-grandfather, born in the Netherlands and Eyglye Theunise, 11th great-grandmother , born in the Netherlands.

Also in this generation are immigrant ancestors Jurian Westvaal, 11th great-grandfather, born 12 Mar 1621 in Leiderdorp, Zuid-Holland, Netherland; Theunis Thomaszen Quick, 11th great-grandfather, born 1601 in Noord-Holland, Netherlands and his wife Belijtgen Jacobusse, 11th great-grandmother, born 1604 in Naarden, Noord-Holland, Netherlands.

Finally, the earliest known immigrant for this line is Hans Jansen, 12th great-grandfather, born 1605 in Prussia (now Germany).

 

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Harwick-Bush Immigrant Ancestors

harwick-bush

We are a nation of immigrants. Most of us descend from others who came to this land whether by their own volition or against their will. With this in mind, I will be documenting all the known immigrant ancestors for both my family and my spouse’s family. This is ninth installment of this series.

***

Six lines down and two to go… Next up in my documentation of our families’ immigrant ancestors is the Harwick-Bush branch of my spouse’s kin.

The most recent immigrant ancestors for this line are Johan Georg Herwig, 3rd great-grandfather, born 17 May 1812 in Kassel, Hesse, Germany and his wife Anna Margaret Kippert, 3rd great-grandmother, born 27 Aug 1813 in Baden-Württemberg, Germany.

In the next generation are immigrants Irvin Robinson, 4th great-grandfather, born 1762 in Enniskillen, Fermanaugh, Ireland and his wife Catharine Elliott, 4th great-grandmother, born 1773 in Enniskillen, Fermanaugh, Ireland.

The next most recent immigrant ancestors are Daniel Busch, 5th great-grandfather, born 1750 in Büderich, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany and his wife Anna Catherina “Catherine” Baum, 5th great-grandmother, born 17 Jun 1760 in Bayern, Germany. Elizabeth Stuchell, 5th great-grandmother twice over through both of her daughters Mary McHenry Croasmun and their Elizabeth McHenry Timblin, born 15 Feb 1775 in Gütersloh, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany, and her parents Johannes “John” Stützel, born 13 Aug 1748 in Breidenbach, Marburg-Biedenkopf, Hesse, Germany and his wife Mary Catharina Lydick, born 1742 in Germany (6th great grandparents twice over through both their daughter Mary McHenry and their daughter Elizabeth McHenry) are the first child-parent immigrant ancestor combos for the Harwick-Bush line. Joining them are Robert Kinkead, 5th great-grandfather, born 18 Oct 1768 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland; his wife Mary McClelland, 5th great-grandmother, born about 1780 in Northern Ireland; and his parents David Kinkead, 6th great-grandfather, born 1747 in Omagh, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland and Martha Sproul, 6th great-grandmother, born in Omagh, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland.

The previous generation yields these immigrant ancestors: Elizabeth Johnson, 6th great-grandmother, born 1754 in England; Isaac McHenry, born 1734 in Scotland and his wife Jane Smythe, born 3 Feb 1732 in Ayrshire, Scotland (6th great grandparents twice over through both of their granddaughters Mary McHenry Croasmun and their Elizabeth McHenry Timblin).

The parents of Mary Catharina Lydick (mentioned above) were also known immigrants: Johann Andreas Leydig (Lydick), born 1715 in Württemberg, Germany and his wife Elisabetha Hasslerin, born 1719 in Württemberg, Germany (7th great grandparents twice over through both of their granddaughters Mary McHenry Croasmun and their Elizabeth McHenry Timblin).

They are closely followed by Johan Henrich Silvius, 7th great-grandfather, born 1713 in Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany and his wife Anna Margaretta Bates, 7th great-grandmother, born 1713 in Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany are the next know immigrant ancestors, followed by Hugh Mahurin, 8th great-grandfather, born 1655 in Scotland and his wife Mary Campbell, 8th great-grandmother, born 1667 in Scotland.

One generation removed are Robert Crossman, 9th great-grandfather, born 1 Nov 1622 in Devon, England and his father John Crossman, 10th great-grandfather, born 5 Sep 1588 in Somerset, England; Peter Oliver, 9th great-grandfather, born 1609 in Bristol, England and his parents Thomas Oliver, 10th great-grandfather, born 14 Apr 1582 in Bristol, England and Ann Purchase, 10th great-grandmother, born 1585 in London, England; Sarah Newgate (wife of Peter Oliver), 9th great-grandmother, born 23 Sep 1621 in Bristol, England and her father John Newgate, 10th great-grandfather, born 1580 in Suffolk, England.

The final known immigrant ancestors are Joseph Kingsbury, 10th great-grandfather, born 1605 in Boxford, Suffolk, England and his wife Millicent Ames, 10th great-grandmother, born 1611 in Boxford, Suffolk, England; George Soule, 10th great-grandfather, born 9 Feb 1593 in Eckington, Worcestershire, England and his wife Mary Buckett (Beckett), 10th great-grandmother, born 17 Jan 1590 in Worcester, Worcestershire, England.

 

#ancestry     #familytree     #genealogy     #immigrantancestors

Categories: Harwick-Bush Line, Immigrant Ancestors | Leave a comment

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