On This Day

Abraham Campbell

On this day, 16 May 1893, Abraham Campbell, my 4th great-grandfather, passed away in Cole County, Missouri.

Born on 10 January 1818, in Barren County, Kentucky, Abraham was the son of James and Sophia (Downing) Campbell. His parents were married in Barren County, Kentucky five years prior to his birth on 27 March 1813.

A year later, Abraham’s brother Benjamin Campbell was born on 16 May 1814. Sister Jane Campbell was born on 29 December 1815. Brother James Campbell was born 29 February 1820. Another brother Moses Campbell came along a year later in December 1831. Finally, sister Melvina Campbell was born on 2 April 1836.

At some point between Melvina’s birth and early 1840, the Campbell family migrated west from Kentucky to adjacent Missouri. Many other Kentuckians also moved westward in the 1830s and 1840s. For many, this move might have been motivated by the Platte Purchase in 1836, a land acquisition by the federal government from the local Native Indian tribes. The Platte Purchase comprised lands along the east bank of the Missouri River, adding 3,149 square miles to the northwest corner of the state of Missouri. This area was nearly as large as Delaware and Rhode Island combined.

However, the Campbell family did not set out for these newly acquired lands; instead, they settled in heart of Missouri—Cole County, where, as early as 1816, families from Kentucky and Tennessee had been relocating.

On 5 March 1840, at the age of 22, Abraham Campbell married Sena Roark, age 17, in Cole County, Missouri.

According to the 1840 U.S. Census, newlyweds Abraham and Sena Campbell has set up their home in Moreau Township, Cole County, Missouri.

On 13 February 1841, daughter Clemency Jane Campbell was born in Cole County, Missouri.

On 9 September 1842, son James Gray Campbell was born in Cole County, Missouri.

On 16 April 1844, son Levi Roark Campbell was born in Russellville, Cole County, Missouri. (Levi Roark Campbell was my 3rd great-grandfather.)

On 24 February 1848, daughter Sophia Downing Campbell was born in Cole County, Missouri.

On 22 August 1850, Abraham Campbell, his wife Sena, daughter Clemency, son James, son Levi, and daughter Sophia were residing in Cole County, Missouri. Abraham was a farmer. His property was valued at $500.  Living with them is Levi Roark, Sena’s brother. Abraham’s brother James, his wife Mary, and two young sons Enoch and James resided at the farm next door.

Circa 1850, another son was born to Abraham and Sena. They named him Moses Hickman Campbell.

On 30 June 1853, Abraham and Sena welcomed daughter Sarah Isabelle Campbell, who was born in Cole County, Missouri.

On 3 January 1854, Abraham Campbell purchased 80 acres in Cole County, Missouri, at a cost of $1,25 per acre, for a total of $100. Upon admission as a state, section 16 in every township was given to the state to benefit public education. The land, designated as “township school lands”, was then sold with the proceeds designated for school construction and teacher pay.

On 19 February 1857, their daughter Clemency Jane Campbell married William Steinbergen. Sadly, William died on 5 October 1859, leaving Clemency a young widow with a toddler.

On 16 June 1860, Abraham and Sena were still residing on their farm in Moreau Township, Cole County, Missouri. Living with them was their daughter Clemency and her three-year old daughter Sena; sons James, Levi, and Moses; and daughters Sophia and Sarah. The farm was valued at $3,000, and their personal property was valued at $1,000.

In 1861, the South seceded from the North, and the Civil War commenced. Missouri was a hotly contested border state—a slave state that did not secede from the Union. As Missouri was populated by both Union and Confederate sympathizers, armies and supplies were sent to both sides, the state was represented with a star on both flags, and dual governments were established. Discord abounded; family members were pitted against family members, and neighbors fought against neighbors.

About 42 percent of the early hostilities of the Civil War occurred in Missouri. In 1861, of the 157 engagements and battles listed in the Army Register, 66 happened in Missouri. In fact, Missouri saw more action than Virginia and West Virginia combined that year.

The Civil War negatively affected the citizens of Cole County, Missouri. On 14 June 1861, the Capture of Jefferson City, involving Missouri’s 1st and 2nd Infantries alongside U.S. Battery F, 2nd Artillery and U.S. 2nd Infantry, Company B, occurred.

On 17 June 1861, in nearby Cooper County, the First Battle of Boonville was fought. This Union victory established what would become an unbroken Federal control of the Missouri River and helped to thwart efforts to bring Missouri into the Confederacy. Three more minor battles would be fought in and around Boonville throughout the war.

On 25 April 1862, there was a skirmish on the Osage River involving Iowa’s 1st Cavalry, Companies D and K.

Meanwhile, amid this upheaval, the Abraham and Sena Campbell welcomed their youngest child on 5 July 1862, daughter Catherine J. Campbell, who was born in Cole County, Missouri.

In October 1864, for four days straight, warfare was widespread in Cole County, Missouri. On 6 October, the Skirmish of Cole County, involving Missouri’s 1st, 7th, and 9th State Militia Cavalry, was fought. On 7 October, a skirmish was fought near Jefferson City, involving Arkansas’ 2nd Cavalry; Illinois’ 17th Cavalry,; Missouri’s 15th Cavalry; Batteries B, C, and L of Missouri’s 2nd Light Artillery; Missouri’s 46th and 49th Infantries; Missouri’s 5th State Militia Infantry; Missouri’s Gasconade Regiment Militia; and Missouri’s Enrolled Militia Cavalry, Artillery and Infantry. On 8 October, another skirmish was fought at Jefferson City, involving Missouri’s 1st, 6th, and 7th State Militia Cavalries. Then, on 9 October, a skirmish at Russellville involved a detachment of Missouri’s 6th State Militia Cavalry alongside Missouri’s Battery H, 2nd Light Artillery.

Finally, on 26 November 1864, a skirmish was fought at Osage. This was the last armed altercation of the Civil War that happened in and around Cole County, Missouri.

On 17 September 1866, Abraham’s mother Sophia (Downing) Campbell died in Cole County, Missouri. She was buried in Campbell Cemetery, Cole County, Missouri.

Then, on 26 September 1878, Abraham’s father James Campbell died in Cole County, Missouri. He was buried next to his wife in Campbell Cemetery, Cole County, Missouri.

A year later, on 29 November 1879, tragedy struck the Campbell family, when Abraham’s wife of 39 years, Sena (Roark) Campbell died in Cole County, Missouri. She was 57 years old. Like her in-laws, Sena was buried in Campbell Cemetery, Cole County, Missouri.

Fourteen years later, on 16 May 1893, Abraham Campbell died in Cole County, Missouri. He was 75 years old. He was buried beside his wife in Campbell Cemetery, Cole County, Missouri. His parents are buried nearby.

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Hannah Larue (Lewis) Williams

On this day, 11 May 1921, Hannah Larue (Lewis) Williams died. She was my spouse’s 2nd great-grandmother.

Born on 6 August 1848, in Worth Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania, Hannah Larue Lewis was the daughter of William Monroe Lewis and Susan Neal. William and Susan had married seven years earlier on 14 September 1841, in Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania and were already the parents of three children: Marshall Humphrey Lewis, Rebecca J. Lewis, and Edward Lewis.

On 11 October 1850, William Lewis, his wife Susan, and three of their four children (Marshall, Edward, and Hannah) were shown living in Worth Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania. William Lewis was a collier (coal miner), and Susan was a housewife.

On 1 July 1851, sister Medora Lewis was born in Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania.

Three years later, on 19 February 1854, brother John Lewis was born in Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania.

Then, on 10 March 1854, less than a month after John’s birth, tragedy struck the Lewis family. Hannah’s mother, Susan (Neal) Lewis, died in Worth Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania; she was only 39 years old. The cause of death might have been related to childbirth. Susan was buried in Port Matilda Presbyterian Cemetery, Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania.

Raising six young children alone would not have been easy. On 29 January 1856, William Monroe Lewis married Anna Elizabeth Kelly in Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Together, Hannah’s father and stepmother would have five children: Mary Ann Lewis, William H. Lewis, Minnie Lewis, Buddy Lewis, and Orlando Lewis.

Sadness would once again come to the Lewis household, when Hannah’s brother Edward Lewis died on 19 March 1858. He was only 12 years old. Edward was buried near his mother in Port Matilda Presbyterian Cemetery, Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania.

On 16 August 1860, William Lewis, his wife Anna, 12-year old Hannah, and six-month old William H. were residing in Houston Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania. William was listed as a laborer.

On 5 July 1864, Hannah Larue Lewis married James Bernard Williams in Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania. She was 15 years old; James was 23 years old.

The couple’s first child, Olive C. Williams, was born on 11 June 1865, in Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania.

Hannah and James’ next child, a son, was born on 10 December 1867, in Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania. They named him Orvis Aaron Williams.

On 28 June 1870, Hannah and James were residing in Worth Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania, along with their children Olive and Orvis. James was a laborer, and Hannah was keeping house. The value of their personal property was $3oo.

On 29 April 1873, Hannah’s half-brother Buddy Lewis died. He was less than two-years old.

On 28 September 1876, Hannah and James welcomed their third child, William Lewis Williams (my spouse’s great-grandfather).

On 2 August 1879, son Ebenezer Records Williams was born in Port Matilda, Centre County Pennsylvania.

On 3 June 1880, the Williams family—James, Hannah, Olive, Orvis, William, and Ebenezer—were living in Worth Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania. James B. Williams was now a farmer; Hannah was a housewife.

On 4 August 1882, son James L. Williams, was born. Sadly, a month and a half later, on 14 September 1882, baby James died.

On 24 July 1884, son Charles Thomas Williams was born in Worth Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania.

On 28 October 1885, daughter Adah Bertha Williams was born in Worth Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania.

On 23 November 1886, daughter Nannie Williams was born in Worth Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania. However, she died two months later on 22 January 1887.

On 12 January 1888, daughter Iva Williams was born. Again, the Williams’ family grieved the death of a child, when Iva died a month later on 22 February 1888.

On 16 April 1889, daughter Lizzie Williams was born to the couple. Lizzie lived only six months, dying on 26 October 1889, in Worth Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania.

On 21 May 1891, son LeRoy Williams was born; however, half a year later, LeRoy died on 10 November 1891.

Their final child, daughter Maggie Williams, was born circa 1892. Although she lived longer than some of her siblings, Maggie too died at a young age, circa 1895. (Of the 12 children Hannah Larue (Lewis) William bore, only six survived childhood. One wonders how she was able to cope with losing so many children.)

On 6 June 1900, after 35 years of marriage, Hannah and James Williams were still residing on their farm in Worth Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania. Living with them were their children Ebenezer, Charles, and Adah. James’ youngest brother Aquilla Williams lived with his family on the farm next door.

Then, on 25 January 1907, at the age of 92, Hannah’s father, William Monroe Lewis, died in Tyrone, Blair County, Pennsylvania. He was buried in Port Matilda Presbyterian Cemetery, Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania.

On 26 April 1910, Hannah and James Williams still resided on their farm in Worth Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania. By then, all of their children were married and living elsewhere.

On 11 April 1912, Hannah’s brother Marshall Humphrey Lewis died in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. He died from facial erysipelas, a bacterial infection of the skin on his face. He was buried in Messiah Baptist Cemetery in Lanse, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania.

Four years later, on 1 August 1916, Hannah’s husband James Bernard Williams died in Worth Township, Centre Chapter, Pennsylvania. The couple had just celebrated their 52nd anniversary a few week’s prior to James’ death.

On 30 May 1920, Hannah’s stepmother Anna Elizabeth (Kelly) Lewis died. She was buried alongside her husband in Port Matilda Presbyterian Cemetery, Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania.

Then, on 11 May 1921, Hannah Larue (Lewis) Williams died in Niagara Falls, Niagara, New York. At the time of her time, Hannah was either residing with or visiting her youngest son, Charles Thomas Williams, who lived with his wife family in Niagara County, New York.

Hannah Larue (Lewis) Williams was buried beside her husband in Port Matilda Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Port Matilda, Centre County, Pennsylvania.

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Categories: On This Day, Williams-Stott Line | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Joseph Thomas

On this day, 8 May, in the year 1901, Joseph Thomas passed away. He was my 4th great-grandfather.

Joseph Thomas was born on 5 September 1815, in Washington County, Maryland. He was the son of Michael Thomas and Mary Painter, who were married on 19 November 1805, in Hagerstown, Washington County, Maryland.

For 25 years, Joseph Thomas resided with his parents and his siblings in Washington County, Maryland.

However, Joseph Thomas’ residence would soon change, when he married Mary Ann Johnston in Washington County, Maryland on 22 July 1840.

A year later, their first child was born on 1 August 1841, in Washington County, Maryland. They named their daughter Lucinda Thomas. (She was my 3rd great-grandmother.)

Circa 1844, their second child, a son named William H. Thomas, was born in Washington County, Maryland.

In January 1845, son Emory E. Thomas was born in Washington County, Maryland.

The next year, son Franklin Thomas was born on 7 May 1846, in Washington County, Maryland.

On 7 September 1850, Joseph Thomas, his wife Mary, and their children Lucinda, William, Emory, and Franklin were still residing in Washington County, Maryland. Joseph Thomas was a farmer. Also residing with their family was a 14-year old male named Joseph Huntsberry, who was probably a farm hand, as Huntsberry is not a family surname.

On 19 June 1853, tragedy struck the Thomas family, when Joseph’s mother Mary (Painter) Thomas died in Washington County, Maryland. She was buried in Fairview Cemetery, Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland.

On 25 November 1856, Joseph’s daughter Lucinda Thomas married William Francis Long (my 3rd great-grandfather) in Washington County, Maryland.

On 29 August 1860, Joseph Thomas, his wife Mary, and their three teenage sons William, Emory, and Franklin were residing in Sharpsburg, Washington County, Maryland. Also living with them was Joseph’s elderly father, Michael Thomas. Joseph was still farming. His real estate was valued at $6,000, and his personal property was valued at $1,200. Daughter Lucinda, her husband, and their baby girl were living a few miles away.

Then, on 1 June 1861, tragedy struck the Thomas family again, when Joseph’s father, Michael Thomas, died in Washington County, Maryland. He was buried next to his wife Mary in Fairview Cemetery, Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland.

Just like William Ferguson Taylor, my 3rd great-grandfather whose life I documented previously, the Civil War would soon arrive smack dab on the Joseph Thomas’ doorstep. On 17 September 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, the Battle of Antietam was waged. It was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history. This battle pitted the Army of the Potomac, numbered at 87,164, against the Army of Northern Virginia, numbered at 38,000. After the last shot was fired and the dust and smoke had cleared, 2,108 Union soldiers were dead, 9,549 were wounded, and 753 were captured or missing. For the Confederates, 1,567 soldiers were dead, 7,752 were wounded, and 1,018 were captured or missing.

Farms in and around the battle were decimated. Crops waiting to be harvested were raised by bullets and cannons or trampled in the troops. Harvested crops were requisitioned by the military to feed the troops. Smaller animals, like pigs and chickens, were confiscated to feed the masses, as were the eggs from laying chickens. The military also requisitioned horses and mules to replace dead, wounded, or exhausted military draft animals. Wooden fences were destroyed during the battle or were dismantled for fire wood. Thousands of wounded required care; consequently, barns and homes were converted into makeshift hospitals. The area around the battlefield was littered with debris—thousands of muskets, bullets, and other military equipment, as well as hundreds of unexploded artillery shells. Wells were depleted, and streams were polluted by human refuse and decaying bodies and horse carcasses. Many farmers in and around Sharpsburg were impoverished as a result of the Battle of Antietam.

Less than two months later, on 11 November 1862, Joseph and Mary’s youngest son, Franklin Thomas died in Washington County, Maryland. He was only 16-years old. Whether his death was caused by an accident, injury, or illness is unknown. Perhaps his cause of death was directly related to the battle or its aftermath? Franklin Thomas was buried in in Fairview Cemetery, Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland.

The family somewhat rebounded from the devastation caused by that infamous battle. By 20 July 1870, census records show Joseph Thomas still living with his wife Mary and son Emory on his farm in Sharpsburg, Washington County, Maryland. Daughter Lucinda (Thomas) Long and her daughter Ellen (my 2nd great-grandmother) lived with them. Joseph was listed as a retired farmer, and Mary was keeping house. The farm was valued at $7,800, with personal property valued at $300. (It is interesting to note that although the value of the land/property had increased in ten years, the value of Joseph Thomas’ personal property had significantly diminished over the course of a decade.) Son William Thomas lived on the farm next door, along with his wife Ellen and daughter Edith.

On 4 June 1880, Joseph Thomas and his wife Mary lived on a farm in Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland. Still living with them are daughter Lucinda (Thomas) Long and granddaughter Ellen V. Long. Son Emory and his family live next door. At first glance, one would assume that Joseph Thomas had moved; however, upon closer inspection, it is discovered that the town of Sharpsburg is less than four miles from the town of Keedysville. My educated guess is that the Thomas family did not move; instead, their town “affiliation” probably changed.

On 7 August 1895, Joseph’s wife Mary. E. (Johnston) Thomas died in Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland. The couple had just celebrated their 55th wedding anniversary. Mary was buried near her son Franklin in Fairview Cemetery, Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland.

On 14 June 1900, Joseph Thomas still resided in Washington County, Maryland. Daughter Lucinda (Thomas) Long was keeping house for her father. He owned his home, mortgage free, but no longer had a farm. Joseph Thomas’ profession was listed as capitalist, which leads me to assume he invested monies. Son Emory and his family live two doors down on a farm.

Then, on 8 May 1901, at the age of 85, Joseph Thomas died in Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland. He was buried next to his wife in Fairview Cemetery, Keedysville, Washington County, Maryland.

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George Thadeous Bush

On this day, 2 May 1904, George Thadeous Bush died in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. He was my spouse’s 2nd great-grandfather.

George Thadeous Bush was born on 25 January 1856, in Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. He was the first-born child of David Byron Bush and Jane Timblin, who were married on 16 November 1854, in Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

Together, his parents would have 10 known children (from eldest to youngest): George Thadeous, Hester Ann, James Clark, Elizabeth Catharine, Margaret E., Ida Eva, Jacob L., Samuel, John M., and Byron Joseph.

On 22 August 1860, five-year old George Thadeous Bush was residing with his parents, sister Hester, and brother James in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. His father was a farmer, and his mother was a housewife. The value of the farm was estimated at $400, and the value of their personal property was estimated at $170. Also residing with them was a 12-year old male named Madison Ayres. As the name Ayres is not a known family surname, perhaps this boy was a farm hand.

On 27 July 1870, George Thadeous Bush, now 15-years old, was residing with his parents and siblings in Canoe Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. His father was a blacksmith, and his mother was a housewife. Their real estate was estimated at $500, and their personal property was estimated at $200.

On 31 December 1877, George Thadeous Bush married Mary Ann “Anna” Roush in Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 21 June 1879, daughter Bertha May Bush was born in Perry Township, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania.

On 5 June 1880, George Thadeous Bush was residing with his wife and daughter in Perry Township, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. Also living with him was his 13-year old sister Eva. George was employed as a farm laborer, possibly working at his father-in-law Samuel D. Roush’s farm next-door.

On 5 November 1880, George and Mary Ann welcomed another daughter to the world, Laura V. Bush.

On 26 May 1882, daughter Nora Ella Bush was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 29 Apr 1884, daughter Margaret “Maggie” Bush was born.

Then, on 11 December 1885, after four girls, a son named Albert Leroy Bush as born.

He was followed two years later by son Samuel Elmer Bush, who was born 30 March 1887, in Covode, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 15 March 1889, daughter Myrtle Blanche Bush (my spouse’s great-grandmother) was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

The next child to be born to George and Mary Ann was a daughter Lillie Bush, who arrived on 17 August 1890. Sadly, she died that same day.

On 24 September 1891, they were blessed with another daughter, Lula “Lulu” Mabel Bush.

On 11 August 1893, daughter Effie Alean Bush was born in Rayne Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 31 October 1895, son Arthur Klock Bush was born in Covode, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 12 October 1897, son Murray Miles Bush was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 7 June 1900, George Thadeous Bush, his wife, and their 11 of their children were residing on their farm in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 30 May 1901, his namesake George Thadeous Bush, Jr. was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. On 28 February 1902, a few months before his first birthday, baby George died.

After 13 children, with two dying as infants, one would think that George and Mary Ann might be apprehensive about having any other children. However, that was not the case. On 10 October 1903, the couple welcomed son Charles “Chuck” Franklin Bush to the family. He would be their final child.

Sometime in late April 1904, George Thadeous Bush contracted pneumonia, and on 2 May 1904, he died. He was only 48 years old. He left behind his parents. nine siblings, his wife, and 12 children.

George Thadeous Bush was buried at Covode Presbyterian Cemetery, Indiana County, Pennsylvania, near his babies Lillie and George.

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Categories: Harwick-Bush Line, On This Day | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mary (McHenry) Croasmun

On 30 April 1878, Mary (McHenry) Croasmun died in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. She was my spouse’s 4th great-grandmother.

Mary McHenry was born on 12 February 1799, in East Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. She was the third of eight children born to James McHenry and Elizabeth Stuchell, who were married in 1795 in Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 27 July 1812, when Mary was only 13 years old, her father James McHenry died. He was only 37 years old. (Incidentally, both of James’ parents died in 1812, as well. Perhaps there was a pervasive sickness that went through their community that year?) With James’ death, Elizabeth (Stuchell) McHenry was left to raise eight children on her own.

On 15 July 1819, Mary McHenry married Asa Croasmun in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Asa was the son of Asa Croasmun and Patience Oliver.

On 22 February 1822, daughter Mary Martha Croasmun (my spouse’s 3rd great-grandmother) was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 8 March 1824, son Isaac Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 9 April 1826, son Nathan Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 1 October 1828, son Asa Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

In 1830, Mary, her husband Asa, one daughter between the age 5-10 (Mary Martha), one son between the age 5-10 (Issac), and two sons under the age of 5 (Nathan and Asa) were residing in Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 10 September 1831, son Miles Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 10 September 1834, James W. Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 25 August 1836, son William Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

In 25 April 1842, daughter Elizabeth Jane Croasmun was born in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 4 October 1850, Mary, her husband Asa, and seven of their children still were living on their farm in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. At the time, the farm was valued at $5,000. Also living with them was Asa’s sister-in-law Mary Croasmun, a widow at the age of 27, and her daughter Eliza, age 6.

In 1851, Mary (McHenry) Croasmun lost her mother, Elizabeth (Stuchell) McHenry. As painful as the loss of a parent is, nothing would compare to the sadness Mary would soon incur.

On 25 January 1853, tragedy struck the Croasmun family. Son William Croasmun died in Hamilton, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. He was 16 years old.

On 15 August 1860, Mary, her husband Asa, their son Miles, and their daughter Elizabeth were still residing on their farm in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. By now, the property was worth $11,500, and their personal property was valued at $1,310. Sons Issac and Asa and their families lived a few doors down.

On 19 February 1864, Mary’s husband Asa Croasmun died in Hamilton, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. He was 69 years old. Asa was buried at White Church Cemetery, in Hamilton, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania.

On 4 August 1870, Mary (McHenry) Croasmun was residing with her son Miles on his farm (what once was his father’s farm) in North Mahoning, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

On 30 April 1878, at the age if 79 years, Mary (McHenry) Croasmun died in North Mahoning Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. She was buried beside her husband at White Church Cemetery, in Hamilton, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania.

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Categories: Harwick-Bush Line, On This Day | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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