Watts-Stark Line

ABCs & Our Family Trees: Letters I & J

  

I have always been fascinated by language, specifically where it originates and how it adapts, mutates, and relates to other languages. That is why I found the recent series of blogs by Andrew’s Kindred so intriguing. It combined my love of etymology with my love of genealogy.  I was so inspired, in fact, that I decided to try my hand at chronicling the origins of our families’ surnames.


This is the ninth installment of a series of posts documenting the etymology of many of our families’ surnames (recent and distant, direct and indirect.)

Now that the H names have been discussed, next up are the letters I and J:

Ihrich (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
German—This surname is composed of the Old High German word ih, meaning I, and the German word ric/reich, meaning rich or powerful.

Isaac (my mother’s paternal line and my brother-in-law’s family)
English—Of Biblical origins, Isaac was the son of Abraham and Sarah. derived from the Hebrew word yiṣḥāq, meaning [he] laughs. The traditional explanation of the name is that Abraham and Sarah laughed with joy at the birth of a son to them in their old age, but a more plausible explanation is that the name originally meant may God laugh/smile on him. In England and Wales, it was one of the Old Testament names that were particularly popular among Nonconformists in the 17th through 19th centuries.

Isted (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname might be a form of Highstead, a locality/village in the county of Kent. However, it might be the name of a lost medieval village. It could be a variation of  East Head, a village far away in the north of Scotland. Highstead means high farm.

Izard (my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is of pre-6th Century Germanic origins. It has two possible origins. The first is from the female personal name Isolde, much associated with the ancient tale of Tristran and Isolde. It is composed of is, meaning ice, and hild, meaning battle, or the masculine Ishard, with the elements is, meaning ice, and hard, meaning hardy or strong. The second possible origin is from the Old Provencal word izar, meaning mountain goat—a nickname given to a good climber or a sprightly, lively person.

Jacobs/Jacobusse (my spouse’s mother’s maternal line)
Dutch—These are patronymic medieval surnames, derived from the Latin name Jacobus. Jacobus is derived from the Hebrew language personal name Yaakov, from the Hebrew word akev, meaning heel. In the Bible, this is the name of the younger twin brother of Esau who took advantage of the latter’s hunger and impetuous nature to persuade him to part with his birthright for a mess of pottage. Jacob was said to have been born holding on to Esau’s heel.

James (my spouse’s father’s maternal line)
English—This medieval surname is of both Biblical and 12th Century Crusader origins. It has its origins in the Hebrew given name Yaakov. Traditionally, the name is interpreted as coming from the word akev, meaning a heel, but has also been interpreted as he who supplanted. Both of these meanings are influenced by the Biblical story of Esau and his younger twin brother Jacob. Jacob is said to have been born holding on to Esau’s heel and took advantage of Esau’s hunger to persuade him to part with his birthright in exchange for food.

Jansen (my spouse’s mother’s maternal line)
Dutch—This is a Dutch/Flemish and Low German patronymic surname meaning son of Jan, a common derivative of Johannes. It is equivalent to the English surname Johnson.

Jenkinson (my brother-in-law’s family)
English—This English surname is much associated with Wales. It is a patronymic form of the medieval male given name Jenkin (son of Jenkin) from the Hebrew name Yochan, meaning the child favored by God.

Jennings (my mother’s paternal line)
English—Of early medieval English origin, this surname is also associated with Wales and Ireland. It is a patronymic surname, deriving from the given name Janyn or Jenyn, meaning little John. John itself derives from the Hebrew name Yochanan, meaning Jehovah has favored (me with a son).

Jiménez (my mother’s paternal line)
Spanish—This surname is of Iberian origin, first appearing in the Basque lands. It is a patronymic construction from the modern-styled given name Jimeno, plus the Spanish suffix -ez, meaning son [of]. The root appears to stem from Basque semen, meaning son.

Johnson (my spouse’s mother’s paternal line, two lines)
English—This surname is a patronymic form of the medieval male given name John (son of John) from the Hebrew name Yochanan, meaning God has favored me (with a son).

Johnston (my father’s paternal line)
Scottish—This surname is of Scottish locational origin from an area in Annandale, Dumfriesshire. The founder of the family, named Jonis, followed his overlords from Yorkshire circa 1174 and was granted the lands to which he gave his name. The second element is the medieval English word tone or toun from the Old English pre-7th Century word tun, meaning a settlement.

Jones (my mother’s maternal line and my mother’s paternal line)
English—This surname is of English medieval origins. It derives either from the male given name John or its female equivalent Joan, both introduced after the Norman Conquest. Both names are written as Jon(e) in medieval documents; a clear distinction between them on the grounds of gender was not made until the 15th Century. However, because of the patronymic nature of  medieval Britain, bearers of the surname Jones are more likely to derive it from John than Joan. John is from the Hebrew word Yochanan, meaning Jehovah has favored (me with a son).

Judd (my mother’s paternal line)
English—Of early medieval English origin, this surname is a diminutive forms of the personal name Jordan. There are two possible sources: it might be an Old German personal name Jordanes, thought to contain the same root as the Old Norse word jordh, meaning land, or it might be taken directly from the name of the river Jordan, derived from the Hebrew word yarad, meaning to go down or to descend (to the Dead Sea). Returning Crusaders and pilgrims would frequently bring back flasks of water from the river Jordan to be used in the baptism of their children, since John the Baptist had baptized people, including Christ Himself, in the river.

 

Well, that’s it for the I and J surnames… Next up is the K surnames.


For more information on the origins of many surnames, check out Almwch Data, Behind the Name, Irish Origenes, Surname Database, Surname Meanings and Origins, Surname Web, and Wiktionary.

#etymology     #familytree     #surnames

Categories: Cole-Marriner Line, Extended Families, Harwick-Bush Line, Spangler-Kenney Line, Surnames from A to Z, Watts-Stark Line, Williams-Stott Line | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Abraham Campbell

On this day, 16 May 1893, Abraham Campbell, my 4th great-grandfather, passed away in Cole County, Missouri.

Born on 10 January 1818, in Barren County, Kentucky, Abraham was the son of James and Sophia (Downing) Campbell. His parents were married in Barren County, Kentucky five years prior to his birth on 27 March 1813.

A year later, Abraham’s brother Benjamin Campbell was born on 16 May 1814. Sister Jane Campbell was born on 29 December 1815. Brother James Campbell was born 29 February 1820. Another brother Moses Campbell came along a year later in December 1831. Finally, sister Melvina Campbell was born on 2 April 1836.

At some point between Melvina’s birth and early 1840, the Campbell family migrated west from Kentucky to adjacent Missouri. Many other Kentuckians also moved westward in the 1830s and 1840s. For many, this move might have been motivated by the Platte Purchase in 1836, a land acquisition by the federal government from the local Native Indian tribes. The Platte Purchase comprised lands along the east bank of the Missouri River, adding 3,149 square miles to the northwest corner of the state of Missouri. This area was nearly as large as Delaware and Rhode Island combined.

However, the Campbell family did not set out for these newly acquired lands; instead, they settled in heart of Missouri—Cole County, where, as early as 1816, families from Kentucky and Tennessee had been relocating.

On 5 March 1840, at the age of 22, Abraham Campbell married Sena Roark, age 17, in Cole County, Missouri.

According to the 1840 U.S. Census, newlyweds Abraham and Sena Campbell has set up their home in Moreau Township, Cole County, Missouri.

On 13 February 1841, daughter Clemency Jane Campbell was born in Cole County, Missouri.

On 9 September 1842, son James Gray Campbell was born in Cole County, Missouri.

On 16 April 1844, son Levi Roark Campbell was born in Russellville, Cole County, Missouri. (Levi Roark Campbell was my 3rd great-grandfather.)

On 24 February 1848, daughter Sophia Downing Campbell was born in Cole County, Missouri.

On 22 August 1850, Abraham Campbell, his wife Sena, daughter Clemency, son James, son Levi, and daughter Sophia were residing in Cole County, Missouri. Abraham was a farmer. His property was valued at $500.  Living with them is Levi Roark, Sena’s brother. Abraham’s brother James, his wife Mary, and two young sons Enoch and James resided at the farm next door.

Circa 1850, another son was born to Abraham and Sena. They named him Moses Hickman Campbell.

On 30 June 1853, Abraham and Sena welcomed daughter Sarah Isabelle Campbell, who was born in Cole County, Missouri.

On 3 January 1854, Abraham Campbell purchased 80 acres in Cole County, Missouri, at a cost of $1,25 per acre, for a total of $100. Upon admission as a state, section 16 in every township was given to the state to benefit public education. The land, designated as “township school lands”, was then sold with the proceeds designated for school construction and teacher pay.

On 19 February 1857, their daughter Clemency Jane Campbell married William Steinbergen. Sadly, William died on 5 October 1859, leaving Clemency a young widow with a toddler.

On 16 June 1860, Abraham and Sena were still residing on their farm in Moreau Township, Cole County, Missouri. Living with them was their daughter Clemency and her three-year old daughter Sena; sons James, Levi, and Moses; and daughters Sophia and Sarah. The farm was valued at $3,000, and their personal property was valued at $1,000.

In 1861, the South seceded from the North, and the Civil War commenced. Missouri was a hotly contested border state—a slave state that did not secede from the Union. As Missouri was populated by both Union and Confederate sympathizers, armies and supplies were sent to both sides, the state was represented with a star on both flags, and dual governments were established. Discord abounded; family members were pitted against family members, and neighbors fought against neighbors.

About 42 percent of the early hostilities of the Civil War occurred in Missouri. In 1861, of the 157 engagements and battles listed in the Army Register, 66 happened in Missouri. In fact, Missouri saw more action than Virginia and West Virginia combined that year.

The Civil War negatively affected the citizens of Cole County, Missouri. On 14 June 1861, the Capture of Jefferson City, involving Missouri’s 1st and 2nd Infantries alongside U.S. Battery F, 2nd Artillery and U.S. 2nd Infantry, Company B, occurred.

On 17 June 1861, in nearby Cooper County, the First Battle of Boonville was fought. This Union victory established what would become an unbroken Federal control of the Missouri River and helped to thwart efforts to bring Missouri into the Confederacy. Three more minor battles would be fought in and around Boonville throughout the war.

On 25 April 1862, there was a skirmish on the Osage River involving Iowa’s 1st Cavalry, Companies D and K.

Meanwhile, amid this upheaval, the Abraham and Sena Campbell welcomed their youngest child on 5 July 1862, daughter Catherine J. Campbell, who was born in Cole County, Missouri.

In October 1864, for four days straight, warfare was widespread in Cole County, Missouri. On 6 October, the Skirmish of Cole County, involving Missouri’s 1st, 7th, and 9th State Militia Cavalry, was fought. On 7 October, a skirmish was fought near Jefferson City, involving Arkansas’ 2nd Cavalry; Illinois’ 17th Cavalry,; Missouri’s 15th Cavalry; Batteries B, C, and L of Missouri’s 2nd Light Artillery; Missouri’s 46th and 49th Infantries; Missouri’s 5th State Militia Infantry; Missouri’s Gasconade Regiment Militia; and Missouri’s Enrolled Militia Cavalry, Artillery and Infantry. On 8 October, another skirmish was fought at Jefferson City, involving Missouri’s 1st, 6th, and 7th State Militia Cavalries. Then, on 9 October, a skirmish at Russellville involved a detachment of Missouri’s 6th State Militia Cavalry alongside Missouri’s Battery H, 2nd Light Artillery.

Finally, on 26 November 1864, a skirmish was fought at Osage. This was the last armed altercation of the Civil War that happened in and around Cole County, Missouri.

On 17 September 1866, Abraham’s mother Sophia (Downing) Campbell died in Cole County, Missouri. She was buried in Campbell Cemetery, Cole County, Missouri.

Then, on 26 September 1878, Abraham’s father James Campbell died in Cole County, Missouri. He was buried next to his wife in Campbell Cemetery, Cole County, Missouri.

A year later, on 29 November 1879, tragedy struck the Campbell family, when Abraham’s wife of 39 years, Sena (Roark) Campbell died in Cole County, Missouri. She was 57 years old. Like her in-laws, Sena was buried in Campbell Cemetery, Cole County, Missouri.

Fourteen years later, on 16 May 1893, Abraham Campbell died in Cole County, Missouri. He was 75 years old. He was buried beside his wife in Campbell Cemetery, Cole County, Missouri. His parents are buried nearby.

#ancestry     #familyhistory     #genealogy

Categories: On This Day, Watts-Stark Line | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Order of the Garter

On this day, 23 April, in the year of our Lord 1348, the Most Noble Order of the Garter, the highest order of chivalry and the third most prestigious honor in the United Kingdom, was founded. The Order is dedicated to Saint George, England’s patron saint.

The Order’s emblem is a garter with the motto “Honi soit qui mal y pense.”—”Shame on him who thinks evil of it.” Members of the order wear this emblem on ceremonial occasions.

At the time of its foundation, the Order consisted of King Edward III, together with 25 founder knights, listed in ascending order of stall number in St. George’s Chapel. They are all depicted in individual portraits in the Bruges Garter Book, circa 1431.

Listed below are my ancestors who founded or were inducted into the Order of the Garter:


FOUNDING MONARCH

Edward III of England (my 21st great-grandfather through his son Thomas of Woodstock, my 22nd great-grandfather through his son Lionel of Antwerp of Clarence, my three-times 19th and three-times 20th great-grandfather through his son John of Gaunt, and my 20th great-grandfather through his son Edmund of Langley)


FOUNDING KNIGHTS (in order of induction)

#3Thomas Beauchamp, 11th Earl of Warwick (my 20th great-grandfather through his son Thomas de Beauchamp and my 21st great-grandfather through his daughter Philippa de Beauchamp)

#5,  Ralph de Stafford, 1st Earl of Stafford, 2nd Baron Stafford (my 20th great-grandfather through his daughter Margaret de Stafford, my 21st great-grandfather through his daughter Jane de Stafford, and my 21st great-grandfather through his son Hugh Stafford)

#7,  Roger Mortimer, 2nd Earl of March (my 21st great-grandfather through his son Edmund de Mortimer)

#9, Bartholomew de Burghersh, 2nd Baron Burghersh (my 21st great-grandfather through his daughter Elizabeth de Burghersh)

#13, Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent, 2nd Baron Holand (my 20th great-grandfather through his son Thomas Holland)


OTHER GARTER MEMBERS (in order of induction)

#28, William de Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton (my 22nd great-grandfather through his son Humphrey de Bohun)

#35, Lionel of Antwerp, 1st Duke of Clarence, jure uxoris 4th Earl of Ulster, 5th Baron of Connaught (my 21st great-grandfather through his daughter Philippa of Clarence)

#36, John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (my 19th and my 20th great-grandfather through both his son John Beaufort and my 19th and two-times 20th great-grandfather through his daughter Joan Beaufort)

#37, Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York (my 19th great-grandfather through his son Richard of Conisburgh of Cambridge and my 20th great-grandfather through his daughter Constance of York)

#38, Edward le Despenser, 1st Baron le Despencer (my 20th great-grandfather through his son Thomas le Despenser)

#46, John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby (my 19th great-grandfather through his son Ralph Neville)

#57, Hugh Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford (my 20th great-grandfather through his son Edmund Stafford)

#58, Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, 3rd Baron Holand (my 19th great-grandfather through his daughter Margaret Holland, my 20th great-grandfather through his daughter Alianore Holland, and my 20th great-grandfather through his daughter Eleanor Holland)

#66, Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester, 1st Earl of Buckingham, 1st Earl of Essex (my 20th great-grandfather through his daughter Anne of Gloucester)

#80, Thomas le Despenser, 1st Earl of Gloucester, 2nd Baron le Despencer (my 19th great-grandfather through his daughter Isabel le Despenser)

#87, John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset (my 18th great-grandfather through his daughter Joan and my 19th great-grandfather through his son Edmund)

#89, John Montagu, 3rd Earl of Salisbury, 5th Baron Montagu (my 20th great-grandfather through his son Thomas Montagu)

#99, Richard Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick, Count of Aumale (my 18th great-grandfather through his daughter Anne Beauchamp and my 19th great-grandfather through his daughter Eleanor Beauchamp)

#104, Edmund Stafford, 5th Earl of Stafford, 6th Baron Audley (my 19th great-grandfather through his son Humphrey Stafford)

#105, Ralph Neville, 1st Earl of Westmorland, 4th Baron Neville de Raby (my 18th great-grandfather through his daughter Cecily Neville, my 19th great-grandfather through his son Richard Neville, and my 19th great-grandfather through his daughter Anne Neville)

#109, John Stanley, King of Mann, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (my 19th great-grandfather through his son John Stanley)

#121, Thomas Montagu, 4th Earl of Salisbury, 6th Baron Montagu, 5th Baron Monthermer, Count of Perche (my 19th great-grandfather through his daughter Alice Montagu)

#145, Humphrey Stafford, 1st Duke of Buckingham, 6th Earl of Stafford (my 18th great-grandfather through his son Humphrey Stafford)

#148, Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York (my 17th great-grandfather through his son George Plantagenet)

#150, Edmund Beaufort, 2nd Duke of Somerset (my 18th great-grandfather through his daughter Margaret Beaufort)

#152, Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury (my 18th great-grandfather through his son Richard Neville)

#174, Thomas Stanley, 1st Baron Stanley (my 17th great-grandfather through his daughter Catherine Stanley)

#185, George Plantagenet, Duke of Clarence (my 16th great-grandfather through his daughter Margaret Plantagenet)

#211, Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke of Buckingham (my 16th great-grandfather through his son Edward Stafford)

#248, Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham (my 15th great-grandfather through his son Henry Stafford)

#253, Richard Pole (my 15th great-grandfather through his daughter Ursula Pole)


LADIES OF THE GARTER (in order of induction)

  • Philippa of Hainault, Queen Consort of England (my 21st great-grandmother through her son Thomas of Woodstock, my 22nd great-grandmother through her son Lionel of Antwerp of Clarence, my three-times 19th and three-times 20th great-grandmother through her son John of Gaunt, and my 20th great-grandmother through her son Edmund of Langley)
  • Isabella di Castile, Duchess of York (my 19th great-grandmother through her son Richard of Conisburgh of Cambridge and my 20th great-grandmother through her daughter Constance of York)
  • Eleanor de Bohun, Countess of Essex, Countess of Buckingham, Duchess of Gloucester, Duchess of Aumale (my 20th great-grandmother through her daughter Anne of Gloucester)
  • Constance of York, Countess of Gloucester, Baroness le Despencer (my 19th great-grandmother through her daughter Isabel le Despenser)
  • Katherine de Roet, Duchess of Lancaster (my 19th and my 20th great-grandmother through both her son John Beaufort and my 19th and two-times 20th great-grandmother through her daughter Joan Beaufort)
  • Alice FitzAlan, Countess of Kent (my 19th great-grandmother through her daughter Margaret Holland, my 20th great-grandmother through her daughter Alianore Holland, and my 20th great-grandmother through her daughter Eleanor Holland)
  • Margaret Holland, Countess of Somerset, Duchess of Clarence (my 18th great-grandmother through her daughter Joan Beaufort and my 19th great-grandmother through her son Edmund Beaufort)
  • Joan Beaufort, Countess of Westmorland (my 18th great-grandmother through her daughter Cecily Neville, my 19th great-grandmother through her son Richard Neville, and my 19th great-grandmother through her daughter Anne Neville)
  • Maud Francis, Countess of Salisbury (my 20th great-grandmother through her son Thomas Montagu)
  • Isabel le Despenser, Countess of Worcester and Warwick (my 18th great-grandmother through her daughter Anne Beauchamp)

#englishhistory     #familyhistory     #genealogy

Categories: Cole-Marriner Line, Famous Faces and Places, On This Day, Royal Roots, Watts-Stark Line | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

14 April: A Day to Remember

On this day, 14 April, history happened:

In the year 979, my three-times great-grandfather Æthelred “The Unready” (through his son Edmund II “Ironside”, my twice-over 30th great-grandfather, and through his daughter Ælfgifu, my 31st great-grandmother) was challenged for the throne of England.

In the year 1471, the Battle of Barnet, a decisive battle in the War of the Roses, was fought. The Yorkists defeated the Lancastrians, killing Richard Neville (my 17th great-grandfather). This military action, along with the subsequent Battle of Tewkesbury, secured the throne for Edward IV.

In 1865, Abraham Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth at Ford’s Theater, Washington DC. President Lincoln died the next day.

In 1894, Thomas Edison held his first public showing of the kinetoscope (moving pictures).

In 1903, Dr Harry Plotz developed a vaccine against typhoid.

In 1912, at 11:40 p.m., the Titanic hit an iceberg off the coast of Newfoundland. The ship sank a few hours later.

In 1935, Black Sunday, the worst sandstorm in Midwest history, created the Dust Bowl. Twenty “black blizzards” devastated the Great Plains, from Canada to Texas. The dust storms caused extensive damage and turned the day into night. Witnesses reported that they could not see five feet in front of them.

And in 1970, in southern Florida, a baby boy was born.

He was no one famous, and his birth was only important to us, his family.

But on that day, that small child drew his first breath. Two hours later, he breathed his last.

He took with him his father’s name and his family’s love.

Nothing remains of him, not even a photo or a footprint. No stone marks his brief passage in time.

Although his was a life not lived, he was…if only for a moment.

And for that reason, 14 April always will be a memorable day in my family’s history.

 

#familyhistory     #familytree     #genealogy

Categories: Cole-Marriner Line, Famous Faces and Places, Noel-Ardinger Line, On This Day, Taylor-Thomas Line, Watts-Stark Line | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Guillaume III d’Aquitaine

On this day, 3 April 963, Guillaume III d’Aquitaine died. He was both my two-times 32nd and my 33rd great-grandfather.

Born circa 915 in Poitiers, France, Guillaume III, nicknamed Towhead because of his hair color, was the son of Ebalus (Ebles) “Manzer” and Emilienne.

After his father’s death in 935, Guillaume III claimed the Duchy of Aquitaine; however, the royal chancery did not officially grant his ducal title until 962. Guillaume III was Count of Poitou from 935, Count of Auvergne from 950, and Count of the Duchy of Aquitaine from 959 until his death.

Circa 936, Guillaume III married Adèle (Gerloc) de Normandie, daughter of Rollo de Normandie and Poppa de Bayeaux. Together, Guillaume III and Adèle had two known children: Guillaume IV (my 32nd great-grandfather) and Adelaide (my 31st and 32nd great-grandmother).

In 936, Louis IV de Francia (my 31st great-grandfather) forced Guillaume III to forfeit some of his land to Hugh “le Grand” de Francia (my 32nd great-grandfather). Although Guillaume III complied, this edict eroded the positive relationship he had with Hugh “le Grand”.

In 950, Louis IV granted the duchies of Burgundy and Aquitaine to Hugh “le Grand”. Hugh “le Grand”, with the assistance of  Louis IV, tried to conquer Aquitaine; however, Guillaume III defeated them.

Louis IV’s son and successor, Lothair, feared Guillaume III‘s power. In August 955. Lothair joined forces with Hugh “le Grand” to besiege Poitiers. Guillaume III gave battle but was defeated.

With the death of Hugh “le Grand” in 956, his son Hugh Capet was named Duke of Aquitaine. Hugh Capet married Adelaide, daughter of Guillaume III.

At some point, Guillaume III tuned over control of Aquitaine to his son Guillaume IV. Guillaume III then retired to the Abbey of Saint-Cyprien in Poitiers. On 3 April 963, Guillaume III d’Aquitaine died in Saint-Maixent-l’École, France.

#familyhistory     #frenchhistory     #genealogy

Categories: Famous Faces and Places, On This Day, Watts-Stark Line | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

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